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Responses of earthworms and microbial communities in their guts to Triclosan.
Chemosphere. 2017 Feb; 168:1194-1202.C

Abstract

Responses of the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and compositions of associated microbial communities were determined after exposure to various concentrations of Triclosan (TCS) for 7 d. Concentrations of TCS were greater in intestines than in epidermis of earthworms, which suggested that earthworms accumulate TCS mainly by ingestion rather than by epidermic penetration. Exposure to TCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) and in malondialdehyde (MDA) in E. fetida. Analyses of both the bacterial and eukaryotic community by next generation sequencing (NGS), demonstrated that TCS caused a concentration-dependent decrease in sensitive genera. While relative abundances of Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Achromobacter were increased. Nine susceptible microbial groups were more sensitive to exposure to TCS, than were activities of enzymes in earthworms. Thus, rapid genomic measures of gut flora can be used as indicators to assess adverse effects of chemicals on earthworms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China.State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China.Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, MEP, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210042, China.State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China; Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; Department of Zoology, and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China. Electronic address: zhangxw@nju.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27810239

Citation

Ma, Lili, et al. "Responses of Earthworms and Microbial Communities in Their Guts to Triclosan." Chemosphere, vol. 168, 2017, pp. 1194-1202.
Ma L, Xie Y, Han Z, et al. Responses of earthworms and microbial communities in their guts to Triclosan. Chemosphere. 2017;168:1194-1202.
Ma, L., Xie, Y., Han, Z., Giesy, J. P., & Zhang, X. (2017). Responses of earthworms and microbial communities in their guts to Triclosan. Chemosphere, 168, 1194-1202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.10.079
Ma L, et al. Responses of Earthworms and Microbial Communities in Their Guts to Triclosan. Chemosphere. 2017;168:1194-1202. PubMed PMID: 27810239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Responses of earthworms and microbial communities in their guts to Triclosan. AU - Ma,Lili, AU - Xie,Yuwei, AU - Han,Zhihua, AU - Giesy,John P, AU - Zhang,Xiaowei, Y1 - 2016/10/31/ PY - 2016/08/19/received PY - 2016/10/19/revised PY - 2016/10/21/accepted PY - 2016/11/5/pubmed PY - 2017/3/4/medline PY - 2016/11/5/entrez KW - Antimicrobial KW - Ecotoxicological assessment KW - Genomics KW - Indicator KW - Invertebrate KW - Next generation sequencing KW - Toxicity SP - 1194 EP - 1202 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 168 N2 - Responses of the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and compositions of associated microbial communities were determined after exposure to various concentrations of Triclosan (TCS) for 7 d. Concentrations of TCS were greater in intestines than in epidermis of earthworms, which suggested that earthworms accumulate TCS mainly by ingestion rather than by epidermic penetration. Exposure to TCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) and in malondialdehyde (MDA) in E. fetida. Analyses of both the bacterial and eukaryotic community by next generation sequencing (NGS), demonstrated that TCS caused a concentration-dependent decrease in sensitive genera. While relative abundances of Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Achromobacter were increased. Nine susceptible microbial groups were more sensitive to exposure to TCS, than were activities of enzymes in earthworms. Thus, rapid genomic measures of gut flora can be used as indicators to assess adverse effects of chemicals on earthworms. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27810239/Responses_of_earthworms_and_microbial_communities_in_their_guts_to_Triclosan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(16)31463-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -