Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding late preterm infants according to mothers' experiences.
BMC Pediatr. 2016 11 08; 16(1):179.BPed

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Late preterm infants account for the majority of preterm births. They are at an increased risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity and are less likely to initiate breastfeeding and to be exclusively breastfed at discharge compared to infants born at term. The aim of this study was to identify the facilitators and barriers to breastfeeding during hospital stays according to the experiences of mothers of late preterm infants.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Mothers who intended to breastfeed and had given birth to a newborn admitted to level I and II care, with a gestational age of 34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks, were enrolled. Sociodemographic data, neonatal variables, mode of feeding and feeding status at discharge were also collected.

RESULTS

A total of 92 mothers who had given birth to 121 infants were enrolled. At discharge, any human milk was fed to 94 % of infants, with exclusively human milk being fed in 43 % of cases; exclusively formula was fed to 6 % of infants. In the multivariate analysis, having expressed breast milk was independently associated with an increased risk of being fed with either any human milk or formula only (OR = 2.73, 95 % CI 1.05-7.1, p = 0.039), whereas being encouraged to practice kangaroo mother care tended to have a protective effect (OR = 0.46, 95 % CI 0.2-1.06, p = 0.07).

CONCLUSIONS

Based on the present findings, health care professionals should strive to fully implement breastfeeding support for mothers of late preterm infants who intend to breastfeed, in particular optimizing breast milk expression and promoting kangaroo mother care. Further studies are needed to gain further insight into the complex interplay of the factors that modulate breastfeeding outcome in late preterm infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, University of Milan, Via Commenda 12, 20122, Milan, Italy. maria.gianni@unimi.it.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, S.I.T.R.A. Basic Education Sector, Via Francesco Sforza 28, 20122, Milan, Italy.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, S.I.T.R.A. Basic Education Sector, Via Francesco Sforza 28, 20122, Milan, Italy.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, University of Milan, Via Commenda 12, 20122, Milan, Italy.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, University of Milan, Via Commenda 12, 20122, Milan, Italy.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, University of Milan, Via Commenda 12, 20122, Milan, Italy.Neonatologia e Terapia Intensiva Neonatale, Polo Universitario F. Del Ponte, Viale Borri 54, 21100, Varese, Italy.Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, University of Milan, Via Commenda 12, 20122, Milan, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27821185

Citation

Giannì, Maria Lorella, et al. "Facilitators and Barriers of Breastfeeding Late Preterm Infants According to Mothers' Experiences." BMC Pediatrics, vol. 16, no. 1, 2016, p. 179.
Giannì ML, Bezze E, Sannino P, et al. Facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding late preterm infants according to mothers' experiences. BMC Pediatr. 2016;16(1):179.
Giannì, M. L., Bezze, E., Sannino, P., Stori, E., Plevani, L., Roggero, P., Agosti, M., & Mosca, F. (2016). Facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding late preterm infants according to mothers' experiences. BMC Pediatrics, 16(1), 179.
Giannì ML, et al. Facilitators and Barriers of Breastfeeding Late Preterm Infants According to Mothers' Experiences. BMC Pediatr. 2016 11 8;16(1):179. PubMed PMID: 27821185.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding late preterm infants according to mothers' experiences. AU - Giannì,Maria Lorella, AU - Bezze,Elena, AU - Sannino,Patrizio, AU - Stori,Elena, AU - Plevani,Laura, AU - Roggero,Paola, AU - Agosti,Massimo, AU - Mosca,Fabio, Y1 - 2016/11/08/ PY - 2016/05/27/received PY - 2016/10/28/accepted PY - 2016/11/9/entrez PY - 2016/11/9/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline KW - Barriers KW - Breastfeeding KW - Facilitators KW - Late preterm infants SP - 179 EP - 179 JF - BMC pediatrics JO - BMC Pediatr VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Late preterm infants account for the majority of preterm births. They are at an increased risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity and are less likely to initiate breastfeeding and to be exclusively breastfed at discharge compared to infants born at term. The aim of this study was to identify the facilitators and barriers to breastfeeding during hospital stays according to the experiences of mothers of late preterm infants. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Mothers who intended to breastfeed and had given birth to a newborn admitted to level I and II care, with a gestational age of 34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks, were enrolled. Sociodemographic data, neonatal variables, mode of feeding and feeding status at discharge were also collected. RESULTS: A total of 92 mothers who had given birth to 121 infants were enrolled. At discharge, any human milk was fed to 94 % of infants, with exclusively human milk being fed in 43 % of cases; exclusively formula was fed to 6 % of infants. In the multivariate analysis, having expressed breast milk was independently associated with an increased risk of being fed with either any human milk or formula only (OR = 2.73, 95 % CI 1.05-7.1, p = 0.039), whereas being encouraged to practice kangaroo mother care tended to have a protective effect (OR = 0.46, 95 % CI 0.2-1.06, p = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present findings, health care professionals should strive to fully implement breastfeeding support for mothers of late preterm infants who intend to breastfeed, in particular optimizing breast milk expression and promoting kangaroo mother care. Further studies are needed to gain further insight into the complex interplay of the factors that modulate breastfeeding outcome in late preterm infants. SN - 1471-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27821185/Facilitators_and_barriers_of_breastfeeding_late_preterm_infants_according_to_mothers'_experiences_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -