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Contributions of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task.
J Vis. 2016 11 01; 16(14):12.JV

Abstract

The position of a saccade target can be encoded in gaze-centered coordinates, that is, relative to the current gaze position, or in object-centered coordinates, that is, relative to an object in the environment. We tested the role of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task involving the Brentano version of the Müller-Lyer illusion. The two visual targets were presented either sequentially, requiring gaze-centered coding of the second saccade target, or simultaneously, thereby providing additional object-centered information about the location of the second target relative to the first. We found that the endpoint of the second saccade was affected by the illusion, irrespective of whether the targets were presented sequentially or simultaneously, suggesting that participants used a gaze-centered updating strategy. We found that variability in saccade endpoints was reduced when object-centered information was consistently available but not when its presence varied from trial to trial. Our results suggest that gaze-centered coding is dominant in the planning of sequential saccades, whereas object-centered information plays a relatively small role.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, the Netherlands. a.debrouwer@queensu.ca.Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, the Netherlands. p.medendorp@donders.ru.nl. http://www.sensorimotorlab.com.Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, the Netherlands. j.b.j.smeets@vu.nl. http://personal.fbw.vu.nl/~jsmeets/.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27846340

Citation

de Brouwer, Anouk J., et al. "Contributions of Gaze-centered and Object-centered Coding in a Double-step Saccade Task." Journal of Vision, vol. 16, no. 14, 2016, p. 12.
de Brouwer AJ, Medendorp WP, Smeets JB. Contributions of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task. J Vis. 2016;16(14):12.
de Brouwer, A. J., Medendorp, W. P., & Smeets, J. B. (2016). Contributions of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task. Journal of Vision, 16(14), 12. https://doi.org/10.1167/16.14.12
de Brouwer AJ, Medendorp WP, Smeets JB. Contributions of Gaze-centered and Object-centered Coding in a Double-step Saccade Task. J Vis. 2016 11 1;16(14):12. PubMed PMID: 27846340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contributions of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task. AU - de Brouwer,Anouk J, AU - Medendorp,W Pieter, AU - Smeets,Jeroen B J, PY - 2016/11/16/entrez PY - 2016/11/16/pubmed PY - 2017/7/1/medline SP - 12 EP - 12 JF - Journal of vision JO - J Vis VL - 16 IS - 14 N2 - The position of a saccade target can be encoded in gaze-centered coordinates, that is, relative to the current gaze position, or in object-centered coordinates, that is, relative to an object in the environment. We tested the role of gaze-centered and object-centered coding in a double-step saccade task involving the Brentano version of the Müller-Lyer illusion. The two visual targets were presented either sequentially, requiring gaze-centered coding of the second saccade target, or simultaneously, thereby providing additional object-centered information about the location of the second target relative to the first. We found that the endpoint of the second saccade was affected by the illusion, irrespective of whether the targets were presented sequentially or simultaneously, suggesting that participants used a gaze-centered updating strategy. We found that variability in saccade endpoints was reduced when object-centered information was consistently available but not when its presence varied from trial to trial. Our results suggest that gaze-centered coding is dominant in the planning of sequential saccades, whereas object-centered information plays a relatively small role. SN - 1534-7362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27846340/Contributions_of_gaze_centered_and_object_centered_coding_in_a_double_step_saccade_task_ L2 - http://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/16.14.12 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -