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Further evidence of the limited role of candidate genes in relation to infant-mother attachment outcomes.
Attach Hum Dev. 2017 Feb; 19(1):76-105.AH

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the associations between specific candidate genes (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, biallelic and tri-allelic 5HTTLPR, and OXTR) and infant attachment outcomes as main effects and in conjunction with maternal sensitivity. The sample included 200 infants (97 European American, 94 African-American, and 9 biracial) and their mothers. Maternal sensitivity and overtly negative maternal behavior were observed when infants were 6 months and 1 year old in distress-eliciting contexts, attachment was assessed via the Strange Situation at age 1, and DNA samples were collected when children were 2 years old. Consistent with recent research in large samples, there was little evidence that these genes are associated with attachment security, disorganization, or distress as main effects (in additive, dominant, and homozygous models) or in conjunction with maternal sensitivity or overtly negative behavior (primarily dominance models). Furthermore, there was little evidence that associations vary as a function of race.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Human Development and Family Studies , The University of North Carolina at Greensboro , Greensboro , NC , USA.a Human Development and Family Studies , The University of North Carolina at Greensboro , Greensboro , NC , USA.a Human Development and Family Studies , The University of North Carolina at Greensboro , Greensboro , NC , USA.a Human Development and Family Studies , The University of North Carolina at Greensboro , Greensboro , NC , USA.b Center for Biotechnology, Genomics, and Health Research , The University of North Carolina at Greensboro , Greensboro , NC , USA.c Institute for Behavioral Genetics , University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder , CO , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27852134

Citation

Leerkes, Esther M., et al. "Further Evidence of the Limited Role of Candidate Genes in Relation to Infant-mother Attachment Outcomes." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 19, no. 1, 2017, pp. 76-105.
Leerkes EM, Gedaly LR, Zhou N, et al. Further evidence of the limited role of candidate genes in relation to infant-mother attachment outcomes. Attach Hum Dev. 2017;19(1):76-105.
Leerkes, E. M., Gedaly, L. R., Zhou, N., Calkins, S., Henrich, V. C., & Smolen, A. (2017). Further evidence of the limited role of candidate genes in relation to infant-mother attachment outcomes. Attachment & Human Development, 19(1), 76-105.
Leerkes EM, et al. Further Evidence of the Limited Role of Candidate Genes in Relation to Infant-mother Attachment Outcomes. Attach Hum Dev. 2017;19(1):76-105. PubMed PMID: 27852134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Further evidence of the limited role of candidate genes in relation to infant-mother attachment outcomes. AU - Leerkes,Esther M, AU - Gedaly,Lindsey R, AU - Zhou,Nan, AU - Calkins,Susan, AU - Henrich,Vincent C, AU - Smolen,Andrew, Y1 - 2016/11/16/ PY - 2016/11/18/pubmed PY - 2017/10/27/medline PY - 2016/11/18/entrez KW - Attachment KW - G X E KW - candidate genes KW - maternal sensitivity KW - molecular genetics SP - 76 EP - 105 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - In this paper, we examine the associations between specific candidate genes (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, biallelic and tri-allelic 5HTTLPR, and OXTR) and infant attachment outcomes as main effects and in conjunction with maternal sensitivity. The sample included 200 infants (97 European American, 94 African-American, and 9 biracial) and their mothers. Maternal sensitivity and overtly negative maternal behavior were observed when infants were 6 months and 1 year old in distress-eliciting contexts, attachment was assessed via the Strange Situation at age 1, and DNA samples were collected when children were 2 years old. Consistent with recent research in large samples, there was little evidence that these genes are associated with attachment security, disorganization, or distress as main effects (in additive, dominant, and homozygous models) or in conjunction with maternal sensitivity or overtly negative behavior (primarily dominance models). Furthermore, there was little evidence that associations vary as a function of race. SN - 1469-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27852134/Further_evidence_of_the_limited_role_of_candidate_genes_in_relation_to_infant_mother_attachment_outcomes_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616734.2016.1253759 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -