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Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains in China.

Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis with life-threatening complications, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the molecular epidemiologic features of non-O157 STEC strains from different resources in China and illustrate the role of animal reservoirs or animal-derived foodstuffs in human STEC infections. A collection of 301 non-O157 STEC isolates from domestic and wild animals (i.e., cattle, goat, pig, yak, pika, and antelope), raw meats (i.e., beef, pork, mutton, chicken, and duck), diarrheal patients, and healthy carriers in different regions of China were selected in this study. Of the 301 analyzed STEC isolates, 67 serogroups, and 118 serotypes were identified; this included some predominant serogroups associated with human disease, such as O26, O45, O103, O111, and O121. Eighteen different combinations of stx subtypes were found. Eleven isolates carried the intimin gene eae, 93 isolates contained ehxA, and 73 isolates carried astA. The prevalence of other putative adhesion genes saa, paa, efa1, and toxB was 28.90% (87), 6.98% (21), 2.31% (7), and 1% (3), respectively. The phylogenetic distribution of isolates was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ninety-four sequence types were assigned across the 301 isolates. A subset of isolates recovered from yak and pika residing in the similar wild environments, Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, showed similar genetic profiles and more tendencies to cluster together. Isolates from goat and mutton exhibited close genetic relatedness with those from human-derived isolates, providing evidence that transmission may have occurred locally within intraspecies or interspecies, and importantly, from animal reservoirs, or raw meats to humans. Comparing isolates in this study with highly virulent strains by MLST, along with serotyping and virulence profiles, it is conceivable that some of isolates from goat, yak, or raw meats may have potential to cause human diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.Shandong Center for Disease Control and Prevention Jinan, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.Longgang Center for Disease Control and Prevention Shenzhen, China.Zigong Center for Disease Control and Prevention Zigong, China.Suixian Center for Disease Control and Prevention Suixian, China.Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention Shanghai, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27853704

Citation

Bai, Xiangning, et al. "Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli Strains in China." Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, vol. 6, 2016, p. 143.
Bai X, Hu B, Xu Y, et al. Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains in China. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2016;6:143.
Bai, X., Hu, B., Xu, Y., Sun, H., Zhao, A., Ba, P., Fu, S., Fan, R., Jin, Y., Wang, H., Guo, Q., Xu, X., Lu, S., & Xiong, Y. (2016). Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains in China. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 6, 143.
Bai X, et al. Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli Strains in China. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2016;6:143. PubMed PMID: 27853704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains in China. AU - Bai,Xiangning, AU - Hu,Bin, AU - Xu,Yanmei, AU - Sun,Hui, AU - Zhao,Ailan, AU - Ba,Pengbin, AU - Fu,Shanshan, AU - Fan,Ruyue, AU - Jin,Yujuan, AU - Wang,Hong, AU - Guo,Qiusheng, AU - Xu,Xuebin, AU - Lu,Shan, AU - Xiong,Yanwen, Y1 - 2016/11/02/ PY - 2016/08/25/received PY - 2016/10/17/accepted PY - 2016/11/18/entrez PY - 2016/11/18/pubmed PY - 2017/9/21/medline KW - China KW - MLST KW - Shiga toxin KW - Shiga toxin-producing E. coli KW - non-O157 STEC SP - 143 EP - 143 JF - Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology JO - Front Cell Infect Microbiol VL - 6 N2 - Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis with life-threatening complications, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the molecular epidemiologic features of non-O157 STEC strains from different resources in China and illustrate the role of animal reservoirs or animal-derived foodstuffs in human STEC infections. A collection of 301 non-O157 STEC isolates from domestic and wild animals (i.e., cattle, goat, pig, yak, pika, and antelope), raw meats (i.e., beef, pork, mutton, chicken, and duck), diarrheal patients, and healthy carriers in different regions of China were selected in this study. Of the 301 analyzed STEC isolates, 67 serogroups, and 118 serotypes were identified; this included some predominant serogroups associated with human disease, such as O26, O45, O103, O111, and O121. Eighteen different combinations of stx subtypes were found. Eleven isolates carried the intimin gene eae, 93 isolates contained ehxA, and 73 isolates carried astA. The prevalence of other putative adhesion genes saa, paa, efa1, and toxB was 28.90% (87), 6.98% (21), 2.31% (7), and 1% (3), respectively. The phylogenetic distribution of isolates was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ninety-four sequence types were assigned across the 301 isolates. A subset of isolates recovered from yak and pika residing in the similar wild environments, Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, showed similar genetic profiles and more tendencies to cluster together. Isolates from goat and mutton exhibited close genetic relatedness with those from human-derived isolates, providing evidence that transmission may have occurred locally within intraspecies or interspecies, and importantly, from animal reservoirs, or raw meats to humans. Comparing isolates in this study with highly virulent strains by MLST, along with serotyping and virulence profiles, it is conceivable that some of isolates from goat, yak, or raw meats may have potential to cause human diseases. SN - 2235-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27853704/Molecular_and_Phylogenetic_Characterization_of_Non_O157_Shiga_Toxin_Producing_Escherichia_coli_Strains_in_China_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2016.00143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -