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A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved by Aripiprazole Treatment.
Acta Neurol Taiwan. 2016 Sep 15; 25(3):88-94.AN

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Tardive syndrome is a troublesome complication secondary to the long-term usage of antipsychotic medication. At present, there is a lack of effective treatment for tardive syndrome. Aripiprazole has been used in the treatment of tardive syndrome, with some reports of a good response. However, other reports have suggested that tardive syndrome can actually be induced by aripiprazole. The aim of current study was to investigate whether aripiprazole is beneficial or harmful for the treatment of tardive syndrome in specific patients.

METHOD

We performed a thorough literature search via PubMed. We included all of the studies discussing the relationship between tardive syndrome and aripiprazole, either with regards to "inducing" or "improving" the disease.

RESULT

None of the included studies were well-designed clinical trials, and all were case reports or case series. A total of 26 articles were included in which aripiprazole induced tardive syndrome, and another 24 in which tardive syndrome was improved by aripiprazole treatment. In the "improved" group, there were significantly more cases of schizophrenia than in the "induced" group (p=0.002). However, there were significantly more cases with other miscellaneous diagnoses in the "induced" group than in the "improved" group (p=0.003). In addition, the cases in the "induced" group had a significantly longer duration of aripiprazole usage than those in the "improved" group (p=0.001).

CONCLUSION

Current study is important for clinicians to pay attention to the risk of tardive syndrome when prescribing aripiprazole in patients with a diagnosis other than a psychiatric illness or in the long-term administration of aripiprazole.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.Department of Psychiatry, Tsyr-Huey Mental Hospital, Kaohsiung Jen-Ai's Home, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27854086

Citation

Chen, Yen-Wen, and Ping-Tao Tseng. "A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics Between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved By Aripiprazole Treatment." Acta Neurologica Taiwanica, vol. 25, no. 3, 2016, pp. 88-94.
Chen YW, Tseng PT. A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved by Aripiprazole Treatment. Acta Neurol Taiwan. 2016;25(3):88-94.
Chen, Y. W., & Tseng, P. T. (2016). A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved by Aripiprazole Treatment. Acta Neurologica Taiwanica, 25(3), 88-94.
Chen YW, Tseng PT. A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics Between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved By Aripiprazole Treatment. Acta Neurol Taiwan. 2016 Sep 15;25(3):88-94. PubMed PMID: 27854086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Review of Differences in Clinical Characteristics between Tardive Syndrome Induced or Improved by Aripiprazole Treatment. AU - Chen,Yen-Wen, AU - Tseng,Ping-Tao, PY - 2016/11/18/entrez PY - 2016/11/18/pubmed PY - 2017/6/7/medline SP - 88 EP - 94 JF - Acta neurologica Taiwanica JO - Acta Neurol Taiwan VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Tardive syndrome is a troublesome complication secondary to the long-term usage of antipsychotic medication. At present, there is a lack of effective treatment for tardive syndrome. Aripiprazole has been used in the treatment of tardive syndrome, with some reports of a good response. However, other reports have suggested that tardive syndrome can actually be induced by aripiprazole. The aim of current study was to investigate whether aripiprazole is beneficial or harmful for the treatment of tardive syndrome in specific patients. METHOD: We performed a thorough literature search via PubMed. We included all of the studies discussing the relationship between tardive syndrome and aripiprazole, either with regards to "inducing" or "improving" the disease. RESULT: None of the included studies were well-designed clinical trials, and all were case reports or case series. A total of 26 articles were included in which aripiprazole induced tardive syndrome, and another 24 in which tardive syndrome was improved by aripiprazole treatment. In the "improved" group, there were significantly more cases of schizophrenia than in the "induced" group (p=0.002). However, there were significantly more cases with other miscellaneous diagnoses in the "induced" group than in the "improved" group (p=0.003). In addition, the cases in the "induced" group had a significantly longer duration of aripiprazole usage than those in the "improved" group (p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Current study is important for clinicians to pay attention to the risk of tardive syndrome when prescribing aripiprazole in patients with a diagnosis other than a psychiatric illness or in the long-term administration of aripiprazole. SN - 1028-768X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27854086/A_Review_of_Differences_in_Clinical_Characteristics_between_Tardive_Syndrome_Induced_or_Improved_by_Aripiprazole_Treatment_ L2 - http://www.ant-tnsjournal.com/Mag_Files/25-3/004.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -