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Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Nov 18; 65(45):1265-1269.MM

Abstract

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has increased rapidly in the United States since the mid-1990s. By 2014, an estimated 29.1 million persons, or 9.3% of the total population, had received a diagnosis of diabetes (1). Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among non-Hispanic black (black), Hispanic, and poorly educated adults continues to increase but has leveled off among non-Hispanic whites (whites) and persons with higher education (2). During 2004-2010, CDC reported marked racial/ethnic and socioeconomic position disparities in diabetes prevalence and increases in the magnitude of these disparities over time (3). However, the magnitude and extent of temporal change in socioeconomic position disparities in diagnosed diabetes among racial/ethnic populations are unknown. CDC used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the periods 1999-2002 and 2011-2014 to assess the magnitude of and change in socioeconomic position disparities in the age-standardized prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the overall population and among blacks, whites, and Hispanics. During each period, significant socioeconomic position disparities existed in the overall population and among the assessed racial/ethnic populations. Disparities in prevalence increased with increasing socioeconomic disadvantage and widened over time among Hispanics and whites but not among blacks. The persistent widening of the socioeconomic position gap in prevalence suggests that interventions to reduce the risk for diabetes might have a different impact according to socioeconomic position.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27855140

Citation

Beckles, Gloria L., and Chiu-Fang Chou. "Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 65, no. 45, 2016, pp. 1265-1269.
Beckles GL, Chou CF. Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(45):1265-1269.
Beckles, G. L., & Chou, C. F. (2016). Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 65(45), 1265-1269. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6545a4
Beckles GL, Chou CF. Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Nov 18;65(45):1265-1269. PubMed PMID: 27855140.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities in the Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes - United States, 1999-2002 and 2011-2014. AU - Beckles,Gloria L, AU - Chou,Chiu-Fang, Y1 - 2016/11/18/ PY - 2016/11/18/entrez PY - 2016/11/18/pubmed PY - 2017/1/19/medline SP - 1265 EP - 1269 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 65 IS - 45 N2 - The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has increased rapidly in the United States since the mid-1990s. By 2014, an estimated 29.1 million persons, or 9.3% of the total population, had received a diagnosis of diabetes (1). Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among non-Hispanic black (black), Hispanic, and poorly educated adults continues to increase but has leveled off among non-Hispanic whites (whites) and persons with higher education (2). During 2004-2010, CDC reported marked racial/ethnic and socioeconomic position disparities in diabetes prevalence and increases in the magnitude of these disparities over time (3). However, the magnitude and extent of temporal change in socioeconomic position disparities in diagnosed diabetes among racial/ethnic populations are unknown. CDC used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the periods 1999-2002 and 2011-2014 to assess the magnitude of and change in socioeconomic position disparities in the age-standardized prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the overall population and among blacks, whites, and Hispanics. During each period, significant socioeconomic position disparities existed in the overall population and among the assessed racial/ethnic populations. Disparities in prevalence increased with increasing socioeconomic disadvantage and widened over time among Hispanics and whites but not among blacks. The persistent widening of the socioeconomic position gap in prevalence suggests that interventions to reduce the risk for diabetes might have a different impact according to socioeconomic position. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27855140/Disparities_in_the_Prevalence_of_Diagnosed_Diabetes___United_States_1999_2002_and_2011_2014_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6545a4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -