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Effect of diet on mortality and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.
Nutr Rev 2016; 74(12):737-748NR

Abstract

CONTEXT

Evidence of an association between dietary patterns and individual foods and the risk of overall mortality among cancer survivors has not been reviewed systematically.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this meta-analysis of cohort studies was to investigate the association between food intake and dietary patterns and overall mortality among cancer survivors.

DATA SOURCES

The PubMed and Embase databases were searched.

STUDY SELECTION

A total of 117 studies enrolling 209 597 cancer survivors were included.

DATA EXTRACTION

The following data were extracted: study location, types of outcome, population characteristics, dietary assessment method, risk estimates, and adjustment factors.

RESULTS

Higher intakes of vegetables and fish were inversely associated with overall mortality, and higher alcohol consumption was positively associated with overall mortality (RR, 1.08; 95%CI, 1.02-1.16). Adherence to the highest category of diet quality was inversely associated with overall mortality (RR, 0.78; 95%CI, 0.72-0.85; postdiagnosis RR, 0.79; 95%CI, 0.71-0.89), as was adherence to the highest category of a prudent/healthy dietary pattern (RR, 0.81; 95%CI, 0.67-0.98; postdiagnosis RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.60-0.99). The Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of overall mortality (RR, 1.46; 95%CI, 1.27-1.68; postdiagnosis RR, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.24-1.85).

CONCLUSION

Adherence to a high-quality diet and a prudent/healthy dietary pattern is inversely associated with overall mortality among cancer survivors, whereas a Western dietary pattern is positively associated with overall mortality in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

C. Schwedhelm, H. Boeing, and L. Schwingshackl are with the Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. G. Hoffmann is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. K. Aleksandrova is with the Nutrition, Immunity, and Metabolism Start-up Lab, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.C. Schwedhelm, H. Boeing, and L. Schwingshackl are with the Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. G. Hoffmann is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. K. Aleksandrova is with the Nutrition, Immunity, and Metabolism Start-up Lab, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.C. Schwedhelm, H. Boeing, and L. Schwingshackl are with the Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. G. Hoffmann is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. K. Aleksandrova is with the Nutrition, Immunity, and Metabolism Start-up Lab, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.C. Schwedhelm, H. Boeing, and L. Schwingshackl are with the Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. G. Hoffmann is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. K. Aleksandrova is with the Nutrition, Immunity, and Metabolism Start-up Lab, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.C. Schwedhelm, H. Boeing, and L. Schwingshackl are with the Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. G. Hoffmann is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. K. Aleksandrova is with the Nutrition, Immunity, and Metabolism Start-up Lab, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany. lukas.schwingshackl@dife.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27864535

Citation

Schwedhelm, Carolina, et al. "Effect of Diet On Mortality and Cancer Recurrence Among Cancer Survivors: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies." Nutrition Reviews, vol. 74, no. 12, 2016, pp. 737-748.
Schwedhelm C, Boeing H, Hoffmann G, et al. Effect of diet on mortality and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Nutr Rev. 2016;74(12):737-748.
Schwedhelm, C., Boeing, H., Hoffmann, G., Aleksandrova, K., & Schwingshackl, L. (2016). Effect of diet on mortality and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Nutrition Reviews, 74(12), pp. 737-748.
Schwedhelm C, et al. Effect of Diet On Mortality and Cancer Recurrence Among Cancer Survivors: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies. Nutr Rev. 2016;74(12):737-748. PubMed PMID: 27864535.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of diet on mortality and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. AU - Schwedhelm,Carolina, AU - Boeing,Heiner, AU - Hoffmann,Georg, AU - Aleksandrova,Krasimira, AU - Schwingshackl,Lukas, PY - 2016/11/20/entrez PY - 2016/11/20/pubmed PY - 2017/8/23/medline KW - cancer recurrence KW - cancer survivors KW - dietary patterns KW - food intake KW - meta-analysis KW - overall mortality SP - 737 EP - 748 JF - Nutrition reviews JO - Nutr. Rev. VL - 74 IS - 12 N2 - CONTEXT: Evidence of an association between dietary patterns and individual foods and the risk of overall mortality among cancer survivors has not been reviewed systematically. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this meta-analysis of cohort studies was to investigate the association between food intake and dietary patterns and overall mortality among cancer survivors. DATA SOURCES: The PubMed and Embase databases were searched. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 117 studies enrolling 209 597 cancer survivors were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The following data were extracted: study location, types of outcome, population characteristics, dietary assessment method, risk estimates, and adjustment factors. RESULTS: Higher intakes of vegetables and fish were inversely associated with overall mortality, and higher alcohol consumption was positively associated with overall mortality (RR, 1.08; 95%CI, 1.02-1.16). Adherence to the highest category of diet quality was inversely associated with overall mortality (RR, 0.78; 95%CI, 0.72-0.85; postdiagnosis RR, 0.79; 95%CI, 0.71-0.89), as was adherence to the highest category of a prudent/healthy dietary pattern (RR, 0.81; 95%CI, 0.67-0.98; postdiagnosis RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.60-0.99). The Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of overall mortality (RR, 1.46; 95%CI, 1.27-1.68; postdiagnosis RR, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.24-1.85). CONCLUSION: Adherence to a high-quality diet and a prudent/healthy dietary pattern is inversely associated with overall mortality among cancer survivors, whereas a Western dietary pattern is positively associated with overall mortality in this population. SN - 1753-4887 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27864535/Effect_of_diet_on_mortality_and_cancer_recurrence_among_cancer_survivors:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/nutrit/nuw045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -