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Putting the Barker Theory into the Future: Time to Act on Preventing Pediatric Obesity.

Abstract

Growth and development are key characteristics of childhood and sensitive markers of health and adequate nutrition. The first 1000 days of life-conception through 24 months of age-represent a fundamental period for development and thus the prevention of childhood obesity and its adverse consequences is mandatory. There are many growth drivers during this complex phase of life, such as nutrition, genetic and epigenetic factors, and hormonal regulation. The challenge thus involves maximizing the potential for normal growth without increasing the risk of associated disorders. The Mediterranean Nutrition Group (MeNu Group), a group of researchers of the Mediterranean Region, in this Special Issue titled "Prevent Obesity in the First 1000 Days", presented results that advanced the science of obesity risk factors in early life, coming both from animal model studies and studies in humans. In the future, early-life intervention designs for the prevention of pediatric obesity will need to look at different strategies, and the MeNu Group is available for guidance regarding an appropriate conceptual framework to accomplish either prevention or treatment strategies to tackle pediatric obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Unit, Università degli Studi di Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy. angelo.pietrobelli@univr.it. Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA. angelo.pietrobelli@univr.it.Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Maternal & Child Department del Ponte Hospital, Azienda Ospedaliera di Circolo Fondazione Macchi, 21100 Varese, Italy. massimo.agosti@ospedale.varese.it.Department of Pediatrics, Ospedale dei Bambini "V. Buzzi", Director of the Center for Research on Nutrition (CURN), Biomedical and Clinical Science Department, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20157 Milan, Italy. gianvincezo.zuccotti@unimi.it.Pediatric Unit, Università degli Studi di Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Editorial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27869693

Citation

Pietrobelli, Angelo, et al. "Putting the Barker Theory Into the Future: Time to Act On Preventing Pediatric Obesity." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 13, no. 11, 2016.
Pietrobelli A, Agosti M, Zuccotti G, et al. Putting the Barker Theory into the Future: Time to Act on Preventing Pediatric Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016;13(11).
Pietrobelli, A., Agosti, M., & Zuccotti, G. (2016). Putting the Barker Theory into the Future: Time to Act on Preventing Pediatric Obesity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(11).
Pietrobelli A, et al. Putting the Barker Theory Into the Future: Time to Act On Preventing Pediatric Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 11 17;13(11) PubMed PMID: 27869693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Putting the Barker Theory into the Future: Time to Act on Preventing Pediatric Obesity. AU - Pietrobelli,Angelo, AU - Agosti,Massimo, AU - Zuccotti,Gianvincenzo, AU - ,, Y1 - 2016/11/17/ PY - 2016/10/26/received PY - 2016/10/26/revised PY - 2016/10/26/accepted PY - 2016/11/22/entrez PY - 2016/11/22/pubmed PY - 2017/7/25/medline KW - first 1000 days KW - growth KW - nutrition KW - pediatric obesity KW - prevention JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 13 IS - 11 N2 - Growth and development are key characteristics of childhood and sensitive markers of health and adequate nutrition. The first 1000 days of life-conception through 24 months of age-represent a fundamental period for development and thus the prevention of childhood obesity and its adverse consequences is mandatory. There are many growth drivers during this complex phase of life, such as nutrition, genetic and epigenetic factors, and hormonal regulation. The challenge thus involves maximizing the potential for normal growth without increasing the risk of associated disorders. The Mediterranean Nutrition Group (MeNu Group), a group of researchers of the Mediterranean Region, in this Special Issue titled "Prevent Obesity in the First 1000 Days", presented results that advanced the science of obesity risk factors in early life, coming both from animal model studies and studies in humans. In the future, early-life intervention designs for the prevention of pediatric obesity will need to look at different strategies, and the MeNu Group is available for guidance regarding an appropriate conceptual framework to accomplish either prevention or treatment strategies to tackle pediatric obesity. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27869693/Putting_the_Barker_Theory_into_the_Future:_Time_to_Act_on_Preventing_Pediatric_Obesity_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph13111151 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -