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Prenatal phthalate, triclosan, and bisphenol A exposures and child visual-spatial abilities.
Neurotoxicology. 2017 01; 58:75-83.N

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

During fetal development, sex steroids influence sexually dimorphic behaviors, such as visual-spatial abilities. Thus, endocrine disrupting chemicals that impact sex steroids during gestation may affect these behaviors.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the relationship between prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite, triclosan, and BPA concentrations and visual-spatial abilities in a prospective cohort of 198 mother-child dyads.

METHODS

Data are from a prospective cohort in Cincinnati, OH (HOME Study). We measured nine phthalate metabolites, triclosan, and BPA in maternal urine samples collected at 16 and 26 weeks of gestation. We assessed children's visual-spatial abilities at 8 years of age using the Virtual Morris Water Maze (VMWM), a computerized version of the rodent Morris Water Maze. We quantified the covariate-adjusted change in the time or distance to complete the VMWM and time spent in the correct quadrant during a probe trial with an interquartile range increase in chemical concentrations using linear mixed models and linear regression, respectively.

RESULTS

Boys completed the VMWM faster (4.1s; 95% CI:-7.1, -1.2) and in less distance (1.4 units; 95% CI:-2.8, 0) than girls. Overall, children with higher mono-n-butyl (MnBP), mono-benzyl (MBzP), and mono-carboxypropyl phthalate concentrations completed the VMWM in less time and distance than children with lower concentrations. For example, children with higher MnBP concentrations completed the VMWM in 0.9 less distance units (95% CI:-1.8, -0.0). Child sex modified the association between MnBP and VMWM performance. In girls, higher MnBP concentrations were associated with longer time (1.7s; 95% CI: -0.7, 4.1) and shorter distance (-1.7 units; 95% CI: -2.8, -0.5), whereas in boys, it was associated with shorter time (-3.0s; 95% CI:-5.6, -0.4), but not distance (-0.1 units; 95% CI:1.4, 1.0). Other phthalate metabolites, triclosan, and BPA were not associated with VMWM performance, and sex did not consistently modify these associations.

CONCLUSIONS

In this cohort, greater prenatal urinary concentrations of some phthalate metabolites were associated with improved VMWM performance, particularly among boys. Future studies should confirm these findings and determine if phthalates affect other hormonally sensitive aspects of child neurobehavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States. Electronic address: joseph_braun_1@brown.edu.Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.Departments of Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine and Mt. Sinai, New York City, NY, United States.Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, United States.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States.Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States.Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27888119

Citation

Braun, Joseph M., et al. "Prenatal Phthalate, Triclosan, and Bisphenol a Exposures and Child Visual-spatial Abilities." Neurotoxicology, vol. 58, 2017, pp. 75-83.
Braun JM, Bellinger DC, Hauser R, et al. Prenatal phthalate, triclosan, and bisphenol A exposures and child visual-spatial abilities. Neurotoxicology. 2017;58:75-83.
Braun, J. M., Bellinger, D. C., Hauser, R., Wright, R. O., Chen, A., Calafat, A. M., Yolton, K., & Lanphear, B. P. (2017). Prenatal phthalate, triclosan, and bisphenol A exposures and child visual-spatial abilities. Neurotoxicology, 58, 75-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2016.11.009
Braun JM, et al. Prenatal Phthalate, Triclosan, and Bisphenol a Exposures and Child Visual-spatial Abilities. Neurotoxicology. 2017;58:75-83. PubMed PMID: 27888119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal phthalate, triclosan, and bisphenol A exposures and child visual-spatial abilities. AU - Braun,Joseph M, AU - Bellinger,David C, AU - Hauser,Russ, AU - Wright,Robert O, AU - Chen,Aimin, AU - Calafat,Antonia M, AU - Yolton,Kimberly, AU - Lanphear,Bruce P, Y1 - 2016/11/23/ PY - 2016/09/06/received PY - 2016/11/18/revised PY - 2016/11/21/accepted PY - 2016/11/27/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2016/11/27/entrez KW - Children KW - Endocrine disrupting chemicals KW - Epidemiology KW - Prenatal KW - and neurodevelopment SP - 75 EP - 83 JF - Neurotoxicology JO - Neurotoxicology VL - 58 N2 - INTRODUCTION: During fetal development, sex steroids influence sexually dimorphic behaviors, such as visual-spatial abilities. Thus, endocrine disrupting chemicals that impact sex steroids during gestation may affect these behaviors. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relationship between prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite, triclosan, and BPA concentrations and visual-spatial abilities in a prospective cohort of 198 mother-child dyads. METHODS: Data are from a prospective cohort in Cincinnati, OH (HOME Study). We measured nine phthalate metabolites, triclosan, and BPA in maternal urine samples collected at 16 and 26 weeks of gestation. We assessed children's visual-spatial abilities at 8 years of age using the Virtual Morris Water Maze (VMWM), a computerized version of the rodent Morris Water Maze. We quantified the covariate-adjusted change in the time or distance to complete the VMWM and time spent in the correct quadrant during a probe trial with an interquartile range increase in chemical concentrations using linear mixed models and linear regression, respectively. RESULTS: Boys completed the VMWM faster (4.1s; 95% CI:-7.1, -1.2) and in less distance (1.4 units; 95% CI:-2.8, 0) than girls. Overall, children with higher mono-n-butyl (MnBP), mono-benzyl (MBzP), and mono-carboxypropyl phthalate concentrations completed the VMWM in less time and distance than children with lower concentrations. For example, children with higher MnBP concentrations completed the VMWM in 0.9 less distance units (95% CI:-1.8, -0.0). Child sex modified the association between MnBP and VMWM performance. In girls, higher MnBP concentrations were associated with longer time (1.7s; 95% CI: -0.7, 4.1) and shorter distance (-1.7 units; 95% CI: -2.8, -0.5), whereas in boys, it was associated with shorter time (-3.0s; 95% CI:-5.6, -0.4), but not distance (-0.1 units; 95% CI:1.4, 1.0). Other phthalate metabolites, triclosan, and BPA were not associated with VMWM performance, and sex did not consistently modify these associations. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort, greater prenatal urinary concentrations of some phthalate metabolites were associated with improved VMWM performance, particularly among boys. Future studies should confirm these findings and determine if phthalates affect other hormonally sensitive aspects of child neurobehavior. SN - 1872-9711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27888119/Prenatal_phthalate_triclosan_and_bisphenol_A_exposures_and_child_visual_spatial_abilities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-813X(16)30247-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -