Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Choice architecture to promote fruit and vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): randomized corner store pilot study.
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1297-1305.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To conduct a pilot study to determine if improving the visibility and quality of fresh produce (choice architecture) in corner stores would increase fruit/vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

DESIGN

Six stores were randomly assigned to choice architecture intervention or control. Store-level WIC sales data were provided by the state. Primary outcomes were WIC fruit/vegetable voucher and non-fruit/vegetable voucher sales, comparing trends from baseline (December 2012-October 2013) with the five-month intervention period (December 2013-April 2014). Secondary outcomes were differences in customer self-reported fruit/vegetable purchases between baseline and end of the intervention.

SETTING

Chelsea, MA, USA, a low-income urban community.

SUBJECTS

Adult customers (n 575) completing store exit interviews.

RESULTS

During baseline, WIC fruit/vegetable and non-fruit/vegetable sales decreased in both intervention and control stores by $US 16/month. During the intervention period, WIC fruit/vegetable sales increased in intervention stores by $US 40/month but decreased in control stores by $US 23/month (difference in trends: $US 63/month; 95 % CI 4, 121 $US/month; P=0·036); WIC non-fruit/vegetable sales were not different (P=0·45). Comparing baseline and intervention-period exit interview responses by customers participating in WIC (n 134), intervention store customers reported increased fruit/vegetable purchases compared with control store customers (18 v. -2 %), but this did not achieve statistical significance (P=0·11).

CONCLUSIONS

Placement of fruits/vegetables near the front of corner stores increased purchase of produce by customers using WIC. New policies that incentivize stores to stock and prominently display good-quality produce could promote healthier food choices of low-income families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1General Medicine Division,Department of Medicine,Massachusetts General Hospital,50 Staniford Street,9th Floor,Boston,MA 02114,USA.1General Medicine Division,Department of Medicine,Massachusetts General Hospital,50 Staniford Street,9th Floor,Boston,MA 02114,USA.3Center for Community Health Improvement,Massachusetts General Hospital,Boston,MA,USA.3Center for Community Health Improvement,Massachusetts General Hospital,Boston,MA,USA.2Harvard Medical School,Boston,MA,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27890020

Citation

Thorndike, Anne N., et al. "Choice Architecture to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Purchases By Families Participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): Randomized Corner Store Pilot Study." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 20, no. 7, 2017, pp. 1297-1305.
Thorndike AN, Bright OM, Dimond MA, et al. Choice architecture to promote fruit and vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): randomized corner store pilot study. Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(7):1297-1305.
Thorndike, A. N., Bright, O. M., Dimond, M. A., Fishman, R., & Levy, D. E. (2017). Choice architecture to promote fruit and vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): randomized corner store pilot study. Public Health Nutrition, 20(7), 1297-1305. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980016003074
Thorndike AN, et al. Choice Architecture to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Purchases By Families Participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): Randomized Corner Store Pilot Study. Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(7):1297-1305. PubMed PMID: 27890020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Choice architecture to promote fruit and vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): randomized corner store pilot study. AU - Thorndike,Anne N, AU - Bright,Oliver-John M, AU - Dimond,Melissa A, AU - Fishman,Ronald, AU - Levy,Douglas E, Y1 - 2016/11/28/ PY - 2016/11/29/pubmed PY - 2018/3/7/medline PY - 2016/11/29/entrez KW - Choice architecture KW - Corner stores KW - Fruits and vegetables KW - WIC SP - 1297 EP - 1305 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 20 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To conduct a pilot study to determine if improving the visibility and quality of fresh produce (choice architecture) in corner stores would increase fruit/vegetable purchases by families participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). DESIGN: Six stores were randomly assigned to choice architecture intervention or control. Store-level WIC sales data were provided by the state. Primary outcomes were WIC fruit/vegetable voucher and non-fruit/vegetable voucher sales, comparing trends from baseline (December 2012-October 2013) with the five-month intervention period (December 2013-April 2014). Secondary outcomes were differences in customer self-reported fruit/vegetable purchases between baseline and end of the intervention. SETTING: Chelsea, MA, USA, a low-income urban community. SUBJECTS: Adult customers (n 575) completing store exit interviews. RESULTS: During baseline, WIC fruit/vegetable and non-fruit/vegetable sales decreased in both intervention and control stores by $US 16/month. During the intervention period, WIC fruit/vegetable sales increased in intervention stores by $US 40/month but decreased in control stores by $US 23/month (difference in trends: $US 63/month; 95 % CI 4, 121 $US/month; P=0·036); WIC non-fruit/vegetable sales were not different (P=0·45). Comparing baseline and intervention-period exit interview responses by customers participating in WIC (n 134), intervention store customers reported increased fruit/vegetable purchases compared with control store customers (18 v. -2 %), but this did not achieve statistical significance (P=0·11). CONCLUSIONS: Placement of fruits/vegetables near the front of corner stores increased purchase of produce by customers using WIC. New policies that incentivize stores to stock and prominently display good-quality produce could promote healthier food choices of low-income families. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27890020/Choice_architecture_to_promote_fruit_and_vegetable_purchases_by_families_participating_in_the_Special_Supplemental_Program_for_Women_Infants_and_Children__WIC_:_randomized_corner_store_pilot_study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980016003074/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -