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Effect of ferric ammonium citrate in feedlot diets with varying dried distillers' grains inclusion on ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations and steer growth.
J Anim Sci. 2016 Sep; 94(9):3894-3901.JA

Abstract

Angus-cross steers (= 128) were used to examine the effects of supplementing ferric ammonium citrate (FAC; 300 mg ferric Fe/kg DM) to diets of 20, 40, or 60% dried distillers' grains plus solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, liver mineral and ruminal hydrogen sulfide (HS) concentrations, and carcass traits of finishing steers. Steers were blocked by initial BW (436 ± 10.6 kg) into pens of 4 and randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments (= 5 or 6 pens per treatment) including a 20, 40, or 60% DDGS inclusion diet with (+) or without (-) 300 mg Fe/kg DM from FAC. Liver biopsies (d -9/-10 and 96) and HS measures (d 0, 7, 14, 21, and 95) were determined from 1 steer/pen. Steers were harvested on d 102 and carcass data were collected. A treatment × month effect (≤ 0.006) was noted for ADG and G:F, in which the 20-FAC ADG and feed efficiency were greater (≤ 0.02) between d 0 to 28 but lesser (≤ 0.04) from d 29 to 56 than that of the 20+FAC steers. Final BW linearly decreased (< 0.01) as DDGS inclusion increased. Final BW tended to be greater (= 0.10) in the 60+FAC steers than in the 60-FAC steers, whereas final BW was not different (≥ 0.32) due to FAC supplementation in the 20 or 40% DDGS diets. A quadratic effect was noted for DMI (= 0.02), where 60% DDGS decreased DMI. Within the 20% DDGS diet FAC+ improved DMI (= 0.03) but had no effect within 40 or 60% DDGS inclusion. Ruminal HS concentrations were not affected (≥ 0.25) by FAC, but increasing DDGS linearly increased (< 0.01) ruminal HS values. Liver Cu was decreased (< 0.01) by FAC across all DDGS inclusions and tended to linearly decrease (= 0.06) with increasing DDGS inclusion, whereas liver Fe, Mn, and Zn were not altered (≥ 0.11) by DDGS inclusion. Liver Zn concentrations tended to be (= 0.08) or were (= 0.03) decreased by FAC supplementation within 20 and 40% DDGS, respectively. Increasing the inclusion of DDGS linearly decreased (= 0.04) HCW and quadratically affected marbling score where the 40% DDGS had the greatest (= 0.02) marbling scores. Supplementation of FAC within 60% DDGS improved (≤ 0.03) HCW and LM area. Marbling scores were greater (≤ 0.04) in 20+FAC and 40+FAC compared with 20-FAC and 40-FAC, respectively. In conclusion, although ruminal HS concentrations were not affected by FAC under the conditions of this study, supplementing FAC to diets containing 60% DDGS improved HCW and LM area, suggesting that FAC may be beneficial when dietary S concentrations exceed 0.5%.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27898902

Citation

Pogge, D J., et al. "Effect of Ferric Ammonium Citrate in Feedlot Diets With Varying Dried Distillers' Grains Inclusion On Ruminal Hydrogen Sulfide Concentrations and Steer Growth." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 94, no. 9, 2016, pp. 3894-3901.
Pogge DJ, Drewnoski ME, Snider D, et al. Effect of ferric ammonium citrate in feedlot diets with varying dried distillers' grains inclusion on ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations and steer growth. J Anim Sci. 2016;94(9):3894-3901.
Pogge, D. J., Drewnoski, M. E., Snider, D., Rumbeiha, W. K., & Hansen, S. L. (2016). Effect of ferric ammonium citrate in feedlot diets with varying dried distillers' grains inclusion on ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations and steer growth. Journal of Animal Science, 94(9), 3894-3901. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2016-0657
Pogge DJ, et al. Effect of Ferric Ammonium Citrate in Feedlot Diets With Varying Dried Distillers' Grains Inclusion On Ruminal Hydrogen Sulfide Concentrations and Steer Growth. J Anim Sci. 2016;94(9):3894-3901. PubMed PMID: 27898902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of ferric ammonium citrate in feedlot diets with varying dried distillers' grains inclusion on ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations and steer growth. AU - Pogge,D J, AU - Drewnoski,M E, AU - Snider,D, AU - Rumbeiha,W K, AU - Hansen,S L, PY - 2016/11/30/entrez PY - 2016/11/30/pubmed PY - 2017/5/19/medline SP - 3894 EP - 3901 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J. Anim. Sci. VL - 94 IS - 9 N2 - Angus-cross steers (= 128) were used to examine the effects of supplementing ferric ammonium citrate (FAC; 300 mg ferric Fe/kg DM) to diets of 20, 40, or 60% dried distillers' grains plus solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, liver mineral and ruminal hydrogen sulfide (HS) concentrations, and carcass traits of finishing steers. Steers were blocked by initial BW (436 ± 10.6 kg) into pens of 4 and randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments (= 5 or 6 pens per treatment) including a 20, 40, or 60% DDGS inclusion diet with (+) or without (-) 300 mg Fe/kg DM from FAC. Liver biopsies (d -9/-10 and 96) and HS measures (d 0, 7, 14, 21, and 95) were determined from 1 steer/pen. Steers were harvested on d 102 and carcass data were collected. A treatment × month effect (≤ 0.006) was noted for ADG and G:F, in which the 20-FAC ADG and feed efficiency were greater (≤ 0.02) between d 0 to 28 but lesser (≤ 0.04) from d 29 to 56 than that of the 20+FAC steers. Final BW linearly decreased (< 0.01) as DDGS inclusion increased. Final BW tended to be greater (= 0.10) in the 60+FAC steers than in the 60-FAC steers, whereas final BW was not different (≥ 0.32) due to FAC supplementation in the 20 or 40% DDGS diets. A quadratic effect was noted for DMI (= 0.02), where 60% DDGS decreased DMI. Within the 20% DDGS diet FAC+ improved DMI (= 0.03) but had no effect within 40 or 60% DDGS inclusion. Ruminal HS concentrations were not affected (≥ 0.25) by FAC, but increasing DDGS linearly increased (< 0.01) ruminal HS values. Liver Cu was decreased (< 0.01) by FAC across all DDGS inclusions and tended to linearly decrease (= 0.06) with increasing DDGS inclusion, whereas liver Fe, Mn, and Zn were not altered (≥ 0.11) by DDGS inclusion. Liver Zn concentrations tended to be (= 0.08) or were (= 0.03) decreased by FAC supplementation within 20 and 40% DDGS, respectively. Increasing the inclusion of DDGS linearly decreased (= 0.04) HCW and quadratically affected marbling score where the 40% DDGS had the greatest (= 0.02) marbling scores. Supplementation of FAC within 60% DDGS improved (≤ 0.03) HCW and LM area. Marbling scores were greater (≤ 0.04) in 20+FAC and 40+FAC compared with 20-FAC and 40-FAC, respectively. In conclusion, although ruminal HS concentrations were not affected by FAC under the conditions of this study, supplementing FAC to diets containing 60% DDGS improved HCW and LM area, suggesting that FAC may be beneficial when dietary S concentrations exceed 0.5%. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27898902/Effect_of_ferric_ammonium_citrate_in_feedlot_diets_with_varying_dried_distillers'_grains_inclusion_on_ruminal_hydrogen_sulfide_concentrations_and_steer_growth_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2016-0657 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -