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Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies.
Med Sci Monit Basic Res 2016; 22:146-155MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study sought to appraise the association between raised body mass index (BMI) and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC) by performing a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies. MATERIAL AND

METHODS

Eligible cohort studies were selected by searching PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to May 26, 2016, and the reference lists of retrieved articles were also consulted. The information was screened by two authors separately. We used a fixed-effects model to calculate the overall pooled risk estimates. A random-effects model was used to identify heterogeneity.

RESULTS

The meta-analysis incorporated 14 cohort studies. Nine papers were deemed to be of high quality based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m²), the overall pooled relative risks (RR) of GBC was 1.45 (95% CI 1.30-1.61) for excess body weight individuals (BMI ≥25 kg/m²); 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.18) for overweight persons (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²) and 1.69(95% CI 1.54-1.86) for obese folks (BMI ≥30 kg/m²). A higher risk of GBC was presented in obese women (women: RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-1.99; men: RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.25-1.79). And a positive relationship between overweight and GBC risk was also displayed in female (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11-1.40), but not in male (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.93-1.11). The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies demonstrated that raised BMI has a dramatic association with risk of GBC, especially in women. But, no association between overweight and GBC in men was found.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of Health Statistics and Epidemiology, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, China (mainland).Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).Department of General Surgery, The 6th Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, The People's Hospital of Yuxi City, Yuxi, Yunan, China (mainland).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27899789

Citation

Liu, Hao, et al. "Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: a Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies." Medical Science Monitor Basic Research, vol. 22, 2016, pp. 146-155.
Liu H, Zhang Y, Ai M, et al. Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies. Med Sci Monit Basic Res. 2016;22:146-155.
Liu, H., Zhang, Y., Ai, M., Wang, J., Jin, B., Teng, Z., ... Li, L. (2016). Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies. Medical Science Monitor Basic Research, 22, pp. 146-155.
Liu H, et al. Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: a Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies. Med Sci Monit Basic Res. 2016 Nov 30;22:146-155. PubMed PMID: 27899789.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies. AU - Liu,Hao, AU - Zhang,Yong, AU - Ai,Min, AU - Wang,Jun, AU - Jin,Bo, AU - Teng,Zhaowei, AU - Wang,Yansheng, AU - Li,Li, Y1 - 2016/11/30/ PY - 2016/12/1/entrez PY - 2016/12/3/pubmed PY - 2017/3/25/medline SP - 146 EP - 155 JF - Medical science monitor basic research JO - Med Sci Monit Basic Res VL - 22 N2 - BACKGROUND This study sought to appraise the association between raised body mass index (BMI) and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC) by performing a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eligible cohort studies were selected by searching PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to May 26, 2016, and the reference lists of retrieved articles were also consulted. The information was screened by two authors separately. We used a fixed-effects model to calculate the overall pooled risk estimates. A random-effects model was used to identify heterogeneity. RESULTS The meta-analysis incorporated 14 cohort studies. Nine papers were deemed to be of high quality based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m²), the overall pooled relative risks (RR) of GBC was 1.45 (95% CI 1.30-1.61) for excess body weight individuals (BMI ≥25 kg/m²); 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.18) for overweight persons (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²) and 1.69(95% CI 1.54-1.86) for obese folks (BMI ≥30 kg/m²). A higher risk of GBC was presented in obese women (women: RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-1.99; men: RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.25-1.79). And a positive relationship between overweight and GBC risk was also displayed in female (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11-1.40), but not in male (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.93-1.11). The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed. CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies demonstrated that raised BMI has a dramatic association with risk of GBC, especially in women. But, no association between overweight and GBC in men was found. SN - 2325-4416 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27899789/Body_Mass_Index_Can_Increase_the_Risk_of_Gallbladder_Cancer:_A_Meta_Analysis_of_14_Cohort_Studies_ L2 - https://basic.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/901651 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -