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An updated dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and liver cancer risk.
Sci Rep. 2016 12 02; 6:37488.SR

Abstract

Prospective cohort studies of the relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk have drawn different conclusions. Therefore, a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies was performed to disentangle this causal relationship. Prospective cohort studies of the association between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk published prior to Jan 9, 2016 were identified by searching in the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Extracted data were analyzed using a random-effects model. Of the 2892 records identified using the search strategy, a total of twenty cohort studies from ten publications were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for highest vs. non/occasional coffee drinkers was 0.55(0.44-0.67). No evidence of publication bias was observed (p for Egger's test = 0.229). Sensitivity analysis indicated the results were robust. Dose-response analysis revealed a significant linear dose-response relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk (p = 0.36). Subgroup analyses stratified by pre-specified variables (gender, geographic region, and adjusted factors) indicated similar results within individual subgroups. Our meta-analysis suggested that coffee consumption is inversely associated with liver cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tongren Hospital, Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 310003, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27910873

Citation

Yu, Chengbo, et al. "An Updated Dose-response Meta-analysis of Coffee Consumption and Liver Cancer Risk." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 37488.
Yu C, Cao Q, Chen P, et al. An updated dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and liver cancer risk. Sci Rep. 2016;6:37488.
Yu, C., Cao, Q., Chen, P., Yang, S., Deng, M., Wang, Y., & Li, L. (2016). An updated dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and liver cancer risk. Scientific Reports, 6, 37488. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep37488
Yu C, et al. An Updated Dose-response Meta-analysis of Coffee Consumption and Liver Cancer Risk. Sci Rep. 2016 12 2;6:37488. PubMed PMID: 27910873.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An updated dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and liver cancer risk. AU - Yu,Chengbo, AU - Cao,Qing, AU - Chen,Ping, AU - Yang,Shigui, AU - Deng,Min, AU - Wang,Yugang, AU - Li,Lanjuan, Y1 - 2016/12/02/ PY - 2016/03/24/received PY - 2016/10/11/accepted PY - 2016/12/3/entrez PY - 2016/12/3/pubmed PY - 2018/5/17/medline SP - 37488 EP - 37488 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - Prospective cohort studies of the relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk have drawn different conclusions. Therefore, a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies was performed to disentangle this causal relationship. Prospective cohort studies of the association between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk published prior to Jan 9, 2016 were identified by searching in the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Extracted data were analyzed using a random-effects model. Of the 2892 records identified using the search strategy, a total of twenty cohort studies from ten publications were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for highest vs. non/occasional coffee drinkers was 0.55(0.44-0.67). No evidence of publication bias was observed (p for Egger's test = 0.229). Sensitivity analysis indicated the results were robust. Dose-response analysis revealed a significant linear dose-response relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk (p = 0.36). Subgroup analyses stratified by pre-specified variables (gender, geographic region, and adjusted factors) indicated similar results within individual subgroups. Our meta-analysis suggested that coffee consumption is inversely associated with liver cancer risk. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27910873/An_updated_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_coffee_consumption_and_liver_cancer_risk_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -