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College students coping with interpersonal stress: Examining a control-based model of coping.
J Am Coll Health. 2017 Apr; 65(3):177-186.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The ways that college students cope with stress, particularly interpersonal stress, may be a critical factor in determining which students are at risk for impairing mental health disorders. Using a control-based model of coping, the present study examined associations between interpersonal stress, coping strategies, and symptoms.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 135 undergraduate students from 2 universities.

METHODS

Interpersonal stress, coping strategies, depression, anxiety, and somatization were assessed via self-report.

RESULTS

Students reporting more interpersonal stress reported more depression, anxiety, and somatization, and they reported less use of engagement coping strategies and greater use of disengagement coping strategies. Engagement coping strategies accounted for a significant portion of the association between interpersonal stress and mental health symptoms. Unexpectedly, coping strategies did not moderate the association between stress and mental health symptoms.

CONCLUSION

Interventions designed to improve students' coping strategies may be an effective way to reduce mental health problems on college campuses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychology , Loyola University Maryland , Baltimore , Maryland , USA.b Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University , Nashville , Tennessee , USA.b Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University , Nashville , Tennessee , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27911672

Citation

Coiro, Mary Jo, et al. "College Students Coping With Interpersonal Stress: Examining a Control-based Model of Coping." Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, vol. 65, no. 3, 2017, pp. 177-186.
Coiro MJ, Bettis AH, Compas BE. College students coping with interpersonal stress: Examining a control-based model of coping. J Am Coll Health. 2017;65(3):177-186.
Coiro, M. J., Bettis, A. H., & Compas, B. E. (2017). College students coping with interpersonal stress: Examining a control-based model of coping. Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, 65(3), 177-186. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2016.1266641
Coiro MJ, Bettis AH, Compas BE. College Students Coping With Interpersonal Stress: Examining a Control-based Model of Coping. J Am Coll Health. 2017;65(3):177-186. PubMed PMID: 27911672.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - College students coping with interpersonal stress: Examining a control-based model of coping. AU - Coiro,Mary Jo, AU - Bettis,Alexandra H, AU - Compas,Bruce E, Y1 - 2016/12/02/ PY - 2016/12/3/pubmed PY - 2018/2/7/medline PY - 2016/12/3/entrez KW - Anxiety KW - college students KW - coping KW - depression KW - somatization KW - stress SP - 177 EP - 186 JF - Journal of American college health : J of ACH JO - J Am Coll Health VL - 65 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The ways that college students cope with stress, particularly interpersonal stress, may be a critical factor in determining which students are at risk for impairing mental health disorders. Using a control-based model of coping, the present study examined associations between interpersonal stress, coping strategies, and symptoms. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 135 undergraduate students from 2 universities. METHODS: Interpersonal stress, coping strategies, depression, anxiety, and somatization were assessed via self-report. RESULTS: Students reporting more interpersonal stress reported more depression, anxiety, and somatization, and they reported less use of engagement coping strategies and greater use of disengagement coping strategies. Engagement coping strategies accounted for a significant portion of the association between interpersonal stress and mental health symptoms. Unexpectedly, coping strategies did not moderate the association between stress and mental health symptoms. CONCLUSION: Interventions designed to improve students' coping strategies may be an effective way to reduce mental health problems on college campuses. SN - 1940-3208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27911672/College_students_coping_with_interpersonal_stress:_Examining_a_control_based_model_of_coping_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -