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A harsh parenting team? Maternal reports of coparenting and coercive parenting interact in association with children's disruptive behaviour.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 May; 58(5):603-611.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Parenting and coparenting are both important for children's adjustment, but their interaction has been little explored. Using a longitudinal design and considering two children per family, we investigated mothers' and fathers' perceptions of coparenting as moderators of associations between their coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour.

METHODS

Mothers and fathers from 106 'intact' families were included from the Twins, Family and Behaviour study. At Time 1 (Mchild age = 3 years 11 months, SDchild age = 4.44 months) parents reported on their coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour via questionnaire; at Time 2 (Mchild age = 4 years 8 months, SDchild age = 4.44 months) perceptions of coparenting and the marital relationship were collected by telephone interview. Questionnaire-based reports of children's disruptive behaviour were collected at follow-up (Mchild age = 5 years 11 months, SDchild age = 5.52 months). Multilevel modelling was used to examine child-specific and family-wide effects.

RESULTS

Conservative multilevel models including both maternal and paternal perceptions demonstrated that maternal perceptions of coparenting and overall coercive parenting interacted in their prediction of parent-reported child disruptive behaviour. Specifically, accounting for perceived marital quality, behavioural stability, and fathers' perceptions, only in the context of perceived higher quality coparenting was there a positive association between mother-reported overall coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

When combined with highly coercive parenting, maternal perceptions of high quality coparenting may be detrimental for children's adjustment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27917470

Citation

Latham, Rachel M., et al. "A Harsh Parenting Team? Maternal Reports of Coparenting and Coercive Parenting Interact in Association With Children's Disruptive Behaviour." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 58, no. 5, 2017, pp. 603-611.
Latham RM, Mark KM, Oliver BR. A harsh parenting team? Maternal reports of coparenting and coercive parenting interact in association with children's disruptive behaviour. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017;58(5):603-611.
Latham, R. M., Mark, K. M., & Oliver, B. R. (2017). A harsh parenting team? Maternal reports of coparenting and coercive parenting interact in association with children's disruptive behaviour. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 58(5), 603-611. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12665
Latham RM, Mark KM, Oliver BR. A Harsh Parenting Team? Maternal Reports of Coparenting and Coercive Parenting Interact in Association With Children's Disruptive Behaviour. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017;58(5):603-611. PubMed PMID: 27917470.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A harsh parenting team? Maternal reports of coparenting and coercive parenting interact in association with children's disruptive behaviour. AU - Latham,Rachel M, AU - Mark,Katharine M, AU - Oliver,Bonamy R, Y1 - 2016/12/05/ PY - 2016/10/31/accepted PY - 2016/12/6/pubmed PY - 2017/8/5/medline PY - 2016/12/6/entrez KW - Coercive parenting KW - coparenting KW - disruptive behaviour KW - moderation SP - 603 EP - 611 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 58 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Parenting and coparenting are both important for children's adjustment, but their interaction has been little explored. Using a longitudinal design and considering two children per family, we investigated mothers' and fathers' perceptions of coparenting as moderators of associations between their coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour. METHODS: Mothers and fathers from 106 'intact' families were included from the Twins, Family and Behaviour study. At Time 1 (Mchild age = 3 years 11 months, SDchild age = 4.44 months) parents reported on their coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour via questionnaire; at Time 2 (Mchild age = 4 years 8 months, SDchild age = 4.44 months) perceptions of coparenting and the marital relationship were collected by telephone interview. Questionnaire-based reports of children's disruptive behaviour were collected at follow-up (Mchild age = 5 years 11 months, SDchild age = 5.52 months). Multilevel modelling was used to examine child-specific and family-wide effects. RESULTS: Conservative multilevel models including both maternal and paternal perceptions demonstrated that maternal perceptions of coparenting and overall coercive parenting interacted in their prediction of parent-reported child disruptive behaviour. Specifically, accounting for perceived marital quality, behavioural stability, and fathers' perceptions, only in the context of perceived higher quality coparenting was there a positive association between mother-reported overall coercive parenting and children's disruptive behaviour at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: When combined with highly coercive parenting, maternal perceptions of high quality coparenting may be detrimental for children's adjustment. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27917470/A_harsh_parenting_team_Maternal_reports_of_coparenting_and_coercive_parenting_interact_in_association_with_children's_disruptive_behaviour_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12665 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -