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Association between overall rate of change in rising breath alcohol concentration and the magnitude of acute tolerance of subjective intoxication via the Mellanby method.
Hum Psychopharmacol 2017; 32(1)HP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The magnitude of acute tolerance is a strong predictor of the development of longer-term chronic tolerance and plays a decisive role in risky decisions (e.g., driving after drinking). Therefore, it is important to identify factors that increase the magnitude of this adaptive process. This study explored whether acute tolerance magnitude varied as a function of the overall rate of increase in breath alcohol concentration (BrAC).

METHODS

Twenty-nine young adult social drinkers (M age = 22.55, SD = 3.10; 62.1% women) consumed a moderate dose of alcohol (men: 0.86 g/kg, women: 0.75 g/kg) in a controlled laboratory setting. Subjective intoxication was assessed at matched BrACs (~0.060 g/dl) on each limb of the BrAC curve.

RESULTS

Hierarchical regression results indicated that faster overall increases in BrAC on the ascending limb were associated with greater acute tolerance for subjective intoxication ratings (p < .01, R2 = .29).

CONCLUSIONS

These results present some of the first evidence that faster increases in BrAC may be associated with greater acute tolerance, as indicated by greater reduction in subjective intoxication across the limbs of the BrAC curve. This greater reduction may, in turn, promote heavier drinking and/or engagement in behaviors for which one is unfit (e.g., driving after drinking).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri, USA. Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.Peter Boris Centre for Addictions Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri, USA.Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27925280

Citation

Morris, David H., et al. "Association Between Overall Rate of Change in Rising Breath Alcohol Concentration and the Magnitude of Acute Tolerance of Subjective Intoxication Via the Mellanby Method." Human Psychopharmacology, vol. 32, no. 1, 2017.
Morris DH, Amlung MT, Tsai CL, et al. Association between overall rate of change in rising breath alcohol concentration and the magnitude of acute tolerance of subjective intoxication via the Mellanby method. Hum Psychopharmacol. 2017;32(1).
Morris, D. H., Amlung, M. T., Tsai, C. L., & McCarthy, D. M. (2017). Association between overall rate of change in rising breath alcohol concentration and the magnitude of acute tolerance of subjective intoxication via the Mellanby method. Human Psychopharmacology, 32(1), doi:10.1002/hup.2565.
Morris DH, et al. Association Between Overall Rate of Change in Rising Breath Alcohol Concentration and the Magnitude of Acute Tolerance of Subjective Intoxication Via the Mellanby Method. Hum Psychopharmacol. 2017;32(1) PubMed PMID: 27925280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between overall rate of change in rising breath alcohol concentration and the magnitude of acute tolerance of subjective intoxication via the Mellanby method. AU - Morris,David H, AU - Amlung,Michael T, AU - Tsai,Chia-Lin, AU - McCarthy,Denis M, Y1 - 2016/12/07/ PY - 2015/06/11/received PY - 2016/10/14/revised PY - 2016/11/02/accepted PY - 2016/12/8/pubmed PY - 2017/12/1/medline PY - 2016/12/8/entrez KW - acute tolerance KW - alcohol administration KW - blood alcohol concentration KW - subjective intoxication JF - Human psychopharmacology JO - Hum Psychopharmacol VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The magnitude of acute tolerance is a strong predictor of the development of longer-term chronic tolerance and plays a decisive role in risky decisions (e.g., driving after drinking). Therefore, it is important to identify factors that increase the magnitude of this adaptive process. This study explored whether acute tolerance magnitude varied as a function of the overall rate of increase in breath alcohol concentration (BrAC). METHODS: Twenty-nine young adult social drinkers (M age = 22.55, SD = 3.10; 62.1% women) consumed a moderate dose of alcohol (men: 0.86 g/kg, women: 0.75 g/kg) in a controlled laboratory setting. Subjective intoxication was assessed at matched BrACs (~0.060 g/dl) on each limb of the BrAC curve. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression results indicated that faster overall increases in BrAC on the ascending limb were associated with greater acute tolerance for subjective intoxication ratings (p < .01, R2 = .29). CONCLUSIONS: These results present some of the first evidence that faster increases in BrAC may be associated with greater acute tolerance, as indicated by greater reduction in subjective intoxication across the limbs of the BrAC curve. This greater reduction may, in turn, promote heavier drinking and/or engagement in behaviors for which one is unfit (e.g., driving after drinking). SN - 1099-1077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27925280/Association_between_overall_rate_of_change_in_rising_breath_alcohol_concentration_and_the_magnitude_of_acute_tolerance_of_subjective_intoxication_via_the_Mellanby_method_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.2565 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -