Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of dietary protein and dairy intakes and change in renal function: results from the population-based longitudinal Doetinchem cohort study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 12; 104(6):1712-1719.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence has suggested that protein from dairy may be less detrimental to renal health than protein from nondairy products. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have used cystatin C-based measures of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the associations of sources of protein and dairy with the change in the eGFR in persons with a normal or mildly decreased eGFR.

DESIGN

We included 3798 participants, aged 26-65 y, from the Doetinchem Cohort study who were examined ≥3 times 5 y apart. Intakes of protein and dairy and subtypes of protein and dairy were assessed at each round. With the use of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, the eGFR was estimated from cystatin C with all available samples per participant examined in one assay run. Generalized estimating equation models, which were adjusted for lifestyle, biological, and other dietary factors (monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, and vitamin D) were performed.

RESULTS

The mean baseline eGFR in the total cohort and in subjects with a mildly decreased eGFR (≥1 eGFR of 60-90 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2 during follow-up; n = 1326) was 108.6 and 95.2 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2, and the mean annual decline in both groups was 1.01 and 1.34 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2, respectively. Intakes of total, vegetable, animal, and nondairy protein, dairy protein, cheese, total dairy, high-fat dairy, and fermented dairy were not associated with eGFR changes. In individuals with a mildly decreased eGFR, higher consumption of milk, milk products, and low-fat dairy was associated with less annual decline in the eGFR (P-trend = 0.003). These associations were partially explained by dietary components of dairy (monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, and vitamin D; P-trend < 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher low-fat dairy consumption, but not sources of protein, is associated with less annual decline in the eGFR, particularly in individuals with a mildly decreased eGFR. These associations are partly attributable to other major components of dairy. Confirmation of these results will improve our ability to understand the role of dairy consumption in the prevention of renal dysfunction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; gerrie-cor.herber@rivm.nl. Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands.Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands. Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; and.Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27935525

Citation

Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M., et al. "Association of Dietary Protein and Dairy Intakes and Change in Renal Function: Results From the Population-based Longitudinal Doetinchem Cohort Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1712-1719.
Herber-Gast GM, Biesbroek S, Verschuren WM, et al. Association of dietary protein and dairy intakes and change in renal function: results from the population-based longitudinal Doetinchem cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(6):1712-1719.
Herber-Gast, G. M., Biesbroek, S., Verschuren, W. M., Stehouwer, C. D., Gansevoort, R. T., Bakker, S. J., & Spijkerman, A. M. (2016). Association of dietary protein and dairy intakes and change in renal function: results from the population-based longitudinal Doetinchem cohort study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(6), 1712-1719.
Herber-Gast GM, et al. Association of Dietary Protein and Dairy Intakes and Change in Renal Function: Results From the Population-based Longitudinal Doetinchem Cohort Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(6):1712-1719. PubMed PMID: 27935525.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of dietary protein and dairy intakes and change in renal function: results from the population-based longitudinal Doetinchem cohort study. AU - Herber-Gast,Gerrie-Cor M, AU - Biesbroek,Sander, AU - Verschuren,Wm Monique, AU - Stehouwer,Coen DA, AU - Gansevoort,Ron T, AU - Bakker,Stephan Jl, AU - Spijkerman,Annemieke Mw, Y1 - 2016/11/09/ PY - 2016/05/04/received PY - 2016/10/11/accepted PY - 2016/12/10/entrez PY - 2016/12/10/pubmed PY - 2017/6/15/medline KW - dairy KW - dietary proteins KW - general population KW - longitudinal study KW - renal function SP - 1712 EP - 1719 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 104 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence has suggested that protein from dairy may be less detrimental to renal health than protein from nondairy products. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have used cystatin C-based measures of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). OBJECTIVE: We investigated the associations of sources of protein and dairy with the change in the eGFR in persons with a normal or mildly decreased eGFR. DESIGN: We included 3798 participants, aged 26-65 y, from the Doetinchem Cohort study who were examined ≥3 times 5 y apart. Intakes of protein and dairy and subtypes of protein and dairy were assessed at each round. With the use of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, the eGFR was estimated from cystatin C with all available samples per participant examined in one assay run. Generalized estimating equation models, which were adjusted for lifestyle, biological, and other dietary factors (monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, and vitamin D) were performed. RESULTS: The mean baseline eGFR in the total cohort and in subjects with a mildly decreased eGFR (≥1 eGFR of 60-90 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2 during follow-up; n = 1326) was 108.6 and 95.2 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2, and the mean annual decline in both groups was 1.01 and 1.34 mL · min-1 · 1.73 m-2, respectively. Intakes of total, vegetable, animal, and nondairy protein, dairy protein, cheese, total dairy, high-fat dairy, and fermented dairy were not associated with eGFR changes. In individuals with a mildly decreased eGFR, higher consumption of milk, milk products, and low-fat dairy was associated with less annual decline in the eGFR (P-trend = 0.003). These associations were partially explained by dietary components of dairy (monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, and vitamin D; P-trend < 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Higher low-fat dairy consumption, but not sources of protein, is associated with less annual decline in the eGFR, particularly in individuals with a mildly decreased eGFR. These associations are partly attributable to other major components of dairy. Confirmation of these results will improve our ability to understand the role of dairy consumption in the prevention of renal dysfunction. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27935525/Association_of_dietary_protein_and_dairy_intakes_and_change_in_renal_function:_results_from_the_population_based_longitudinal_Doetinchem_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.116.137679 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -