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Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References on Social Media.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2017 01; 78(1):124-133.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The current study is one of the first to examine how self-reported alcohol consumption, friends' perceived alcohol consumption, and the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references on social networking sites (SNS) is associated with adolescents' sharing of alcohol references on SNS.

METHOD

A cross-sectional paper-and-pencil survey was administered among 3,172 adolescents (n = 3,133 used for analyses, mean age = 17.16 years, SD = 0.93; 50.7% male). Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

RESULTS

First, the results indicated that both self-reported drinking behavior and the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references were related to sharing alcohol references on SNS, but the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references was a stronger predictor than self-reported drinking behavior. Friends' perceived drinking behavior was not a significant predictor. In the second place, self-reported drinking behavior was a stronger predictor for girls than for boys, whereas the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references was a stronger predictor for boys than for girls.

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescents' alcohol-related self-representation is in line with their alcohol consumption and is also strongly related to what their friends are sharing. Thus, adolescents appear to communicate authentically about their drinking experiences, but the decision to do so is heavily influenced by the prevailing social norm regarding alcohol-related communication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Leuven School for Mass Communication Research, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Leuven School for Mass Communication Research, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO), Brussels, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27936372

Citation

Geusens, Femke, and Kathleen Beullens. "Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References On Social Media." Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 78, no. 1, 2017, pp. 124-133.
Geusens F, Beullens K. Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References on Social Media. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2017;78(1):124-133.
Geusens, F., & Beullens, K. (2017). Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References on Social Media. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 78(1), 124-133.
Geusens F, Beullens K. Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References On Social Media. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2017;78(1):124-133. PubMed PMID: 27936372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Strategic Self-Presentation or Authentic Communication? Predicting Adolescents' Alcohol References on Social Media. AU - Geusens,Femke, AU - Beullens,Kathleen, PY - 2016/12/10/entrez PY - 2016/12/10/pubmed PY - 2017/9/12/medline SP - 124 EP - 133 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs JO - J Stud Alcohol Drugs VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The current study is one of the first to examine how self-reported alcohol consumption, friends' perceived alcohol consumption, and the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references on social networking sites (SNS) is associated with adolescents' sharing of alcohol references on SNS. METHOD: A cross-sectional paper-and-pencil survey was administered among 3,172 adolescents (n = 3,133 used for analyses, mean age = 17.16 years, SD = 0.93; 50.7% male). Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses. RESULTS: First, the results indicated that both self-reported drinking behavior and the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references were related to sharing alcohol references on SNS, but the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references was a stronger predictor than self-reported drinking behavior. Friends' perceived drinking behavior was not a significant predictor. In the second place, self-reported drinking behavior was a stronger predictor for girls than for boys, whereas the perceived number of friends sharing alcohol references was a stronger predictor for boys than for girls. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' alcohol-related self-representation is in line with their alcohol consumption and is also strongly related to what their friends are sharing. Thus, adolescents appear to communicate authentically about their drinking experiences, but the decision to do so is heavily influenced by the prevailing social norm regarding alcohol-related communication. SN - 1938-4114 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27936372/Strategic_Self_Presentation_or_Authentic_Communication_Predicting_Adolescents'_Alcohol_References_on_Social_Media_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2017.78.124 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -