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Rhizospheric soil and root endogenous fungal diversity and composition in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices.
Microbiol Res. 2017 Jan; 194:10-19.MR

Abstract

Rhizosphere and endophytic fungal communities are considered critically important for plant health and soil fertility. In response to continuous cropping, Panax notoginseng becomes vulnerable to attack by fungal pathogens. In the present study, culture-independent Illumina MiSeq was used to investigate the rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. The results demonstrated that fungal diversity is increased inside the roots and in rhizospheric. Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were the dominant phyla detected during the continuous cropping of Panax notoginseng. The fungal diversity in the rhizospheric soil and roots of root-rot P. notoginseng plants are less than that of healthy plants in the same cultivating year, thus showing that root-rot disease also affects the community structure and diversity of rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi. Similarities in the major fungal components show that endophytic fungal communities are similar to rhizospheric soil fungal community based on a specialized subset of organisms. Canonical correspondence analysis on the fungal communities in root-rot rhizospheric from both healthy plants and rotation soils reveals that the soil pH and organic matter have the greatest impact upon the microbial community composition during continuous cropping, whereas soil nutrition status does not significantly affect the fungal community composition in response to continuous cropping practices. In addition, the results suggest that the unclassified genera Leotiomycetes, Cylindrocarpon, Fusarium and Mycocentrospora are shown as the potential pathogens which are responsible for the obstacles in continuous cropping of P. notoginseng. Further exploration of these potential pathogens might be useful for the biological control of continuous cropping of P. notoginseng.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China; Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China.Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China.Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China.Department of Biology, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, 1201 West University Drive, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China.Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China. Electronic address: weiyunlin18@gmail.com.Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China. Electronic address: jixiuling1023@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27938858

Citation

Tan, Yong, et al. "Rhizospheric Soil and Root Endogenous Fungal Diversity and Composition in Response to Continuous Panax Notoginseng Cropping Practices." Microbiological Research, vol. 194, 2017, pp. 10-19.
Tan Y, Cui Y, Li H, et al. Rhizospheric soil and root endogenous fungal diversity and composition in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. Microbiol Res. 2017;194:10-19.
Tan, Y., Cui, Y., Li, H., Kuang, A., Li, X., Wei, Y., & Ji, X. (2017). Rhizospheric soil and root endogenous fungal diversity and composition in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. Microbiological Research, 194, 10-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micres.2016.09.009
Tan Y, et al. Rhizospheric Soil and Root Endogenous Fungal Diversity and Composition in Response to Continuous Panax Notoginseng Cropping Practices. Microbiol Res. 2017;194:10-19. PubMed PMID: 27938858.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rhizospheric soil and root endogenous fungal diversity and composition in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. AU - Tan,Yong, AU - Cui,Yinshan, AU - Li,Haoyu, AU - Kuang,Anxiu, AU - Li,Xiaoran, AU - Wei,Yunlin, AU - Ji,Xiuling, Y1 - 2016/10/14/ PY - 2016/03/18/received PY - 2016/08/31/revised PY - 2016/09/23/accepted PY - 2016/12/13/entrez PY - 2016/12/13/pubmed PY - 2017/4/27/medline KW - Continuous cropping KW - Endogenous fungi KW - P. notoginseng KW - Rhizospheric SP - 10 EP - 19 JF - Microbiological research JO - Microbiol. Res. VL - 194 N2 - Rhizosphere and endophytic fungal communities are considered critically important for plant health and soil fertility. In response to continuous cropping, Panax notoginseng becomes vulnerable to attack by fungal pathogens. In the present study, culture-independent Illumina MiSeq was used to investigate the rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi in response to continuous Panax notoginseng cropping practices. The results demonstrated that fungal diversity is increased inside the roots and in rhizospheric. Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were the dominant phyla detected during the continuous cropping of Panax notoginseng. The fungal diversity in the rhizospheric soil and roots of root-rot P. notoginseng plants are less than that of healthy plants in the same cultivating year, thus showing that root-rot disease also affects the community structure and diversity of rhizospheric and root endophytic fungi. Similarities in the major fungal components show that endophytic fungal communities are similar to rhizospheric soil fungal community based on a specialized subset of organisms. Canonical correspondence analysis on the fungal communities in root-rot rhizospheric from both healthy plants and rotation soils reveals that the soil pH and organic matter have the greatest impact upon the microbial community composition during continuous cropping, whereas soil nutrition status does not significantly affect the fungal community composition in response to continuous cropping practices. In addition, the results suggest that the unclassified genera Leotiomycetes, Cylindrocarpon, Fusarium and Mycocentrospora are shown as the potential pathogens which are responsible for the obstacles in continuous cropping of P. notoginseng. Further exploration of these potential pathogens might be useful for the biological control of continuous cropping of P. notoginseng. SN - 1618-0623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27938858/Rhizospheric_soil_and_root_endogenous_fungal_diversity_and_composition_in_response_to_continuous_Panax_notoginseng_cropping_practices_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0944-5013(16)30040-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -