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Temporal specificity of fear conditioning: effects of different conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus intervals on the fear-potentiated startle effect.
J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process. 1989 Oct; 15(4):295-310.JE

Abstract

Separate groups of rats were given 30 pairings of a light (conditioned stimulus, CS) and 500-ms shock (unconditioned stimulus, US) at CS-US intervals of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 800, 3,200, 12,800, or 51,200 ms. Other groups had lights and shocks inconsistently paired. The startle reflex was elicited 2-4 days later with a noise burst alone or 25-51,200 ms after light onset. After CS-US pairings over a wide range of intervals (25-51,200 ms), startle was potentiated in testing, sometimes as rapidly as 50 ms after light onset. Magnitude of potentiation and resistance to extinction were generally greater with longer CS-US intervals. In several groups, potentiation was maximal at a test interval that matched the CS-US interval used in training. This temporal specificity sharpened with increasing numbers of training trials but even occurred with a single training trial in which a 51,200-ms CS-US interval was used. The data indicate that even during simple fear conditioning, animals rapidly learn a temporal CS-US relationship. This has important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of fear conditioning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06508.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2794867

Citation

Davis, M, et al. "Temporal Specificity of Fear Conditioning: Effects of Different Conditioned Stimulus-unconditioned Stimulus Intervals On the Fear-potentiated Startle Effect." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Animal Behavior Processes, vol. 15, no. 4, 1989, pp. 295-310.
Davis M, Schlesinger LS, Sorenson CA. Temporal specificity of fear conditioning: effects of different conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus intervals on the fear-potentiated startle effect. J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process. 1989;15(4):295-310.
Davis, M., Schlesinger, L. S., & Sorenson, C. A. (1989). Temporal specificity of fear conditioning: effects of different conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus intervals on the fear-potentiated startle effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Animal Behavior Processes, 15(4), 295-310.
Davis M, Schlesinger LS, Sorenson CA. Temporal Specificity of Fear Conditioning: Effects of Different Conditioned Stimulus-unconditioned Stimulus Intervals On the Fear-potentiated Startle Effect. J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process. 1989;15(4):295-310. PubMed PMID: 2794867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Temporal specificity of fear conditioning: effects of different conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus intervals on the fear-potentiated startle effect. AU - Davis,M, AU - Schlesinger,L S, AU - Sorenson,C A, PY - 1989/10/1/pubmed PY - 1989/10/1/medline PY - 1989/10/1/entrez SP - 295 EP - 310 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Animal behavior processes JO - J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - Separate groups of rats were given 30 pairings of a light (conditioned stimulus, CS) and 500-ms shock (unconditioned stimulus, US) at CS-US intervals of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 800, 3,200, 12,800, or 51,200 ms. Other groups had lights and shocks inconsistently paired. The startle reflex was elicited 2-4 days later with a noise burst alone or 25-51,200 ms after light onset. After CS-US pairings over a wide range of intervals (25-51,200 ms), startle was potentiated in testing, sometimes as rapidly as 50 ms after light onset. Magnitude of potentiation and resistance to extinction were generally greater with longer CS-US intervals. In several groups, potentiation was maximal at a test interval that matched the CS-US interval used in training. This temporal specificity sharpened with increasing numbers of training trials but even occurred with a single training trial in which a 51,200-ms CS-US interval was used. The data indicate that even during simple fear conditioning, animals rapidly learn a temporal CS-US relationship. This has important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of fear conditioning. SN - 0097-7403 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2794867/Temporal_specificity_of_fear_conditioning:_effects_of_different_conditioned_stimulus_unconditioned_stimulus_intervals_on_the_fear_potentiated_startle_effect_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xan/15/4/295 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -