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Detecting prediabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups: Does the test matter? Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Prev Med. 2017 02; 95:110-118.PM

Abstract

The objectives of this analysis were to compare the ability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post oral load plasma glucose (2hPG), and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to identify U.S. Hispanic/Latino individuals with prediabetes, and to assess its cardiovascular risk factor correlates. This is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 15,507 adults without self-reported diabetes mellitus from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which takes place in four U.S. communities. The prevalence of prediabetes was determined according to individual or combinations of ADA-defined cut points: FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L, 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, and HbA1c=5.7%-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). The sensitivity of these criteria to detect prediabetes was estimated. The prevalence ratios (PRs) for selected cardiovascular risk factors were compared among alternative categories of prediabetes versus normoglycemia [FPG<5.6mmol/L and 2hPG<7.8mmol/L and HbA1c<5.7% (39mmol/mol)]. Approximately 36% of individuals met any of the ADA prediabetes criteria. Using 2hPG as the gold standard, the sensitivity of FPG was 40.1%, HbA1c was 45.6%, and that of HbA1c+FPG was 62.2%. The number of significant PRs for cardiovascular risk factors was higher among individuals with isolated 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L+HbA1c=5.7%-6.4%, or those who met the three prediabetes criteria. Assessing FPG, HbA1c, and cardiovascular risk factors in Hispanics/Latinos at risk might enhance the early prevention of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular complications in this young and growing population, independent of their heritage group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 10188, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States. Electronic address: avilessantal@nhlbi.nih.gov.University of Puerto Rico Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical Sciences Campus, PO Box 365067, San Juan 00936-5067, Puerto Rico. Electronic address: cynthia.perez1@upr.edu.University of Miami, 5665 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Room 408, PO Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL 33124, United States. Electronic address: nschneid@miami.edu.National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20982, United States. Electronic address: savagep@niddk.nih.gov.Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Belfer Building, Room 1306C, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY 10461, United States. Electronic address: robert.kaplan@einstein.yu.edu.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 East Franklin Street, Suite 203, Mail Station UNC staff use CB803, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, United States. Electronic address: tengunc@email.unc.edu.University of Puerto Rico Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical Sciences Campus, PO Box 365067, San Juan 00936-5067, Puerto Rico. Electronic address: erick.suarez@upr.edu.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 East Franklin Street, Suite 203, Mail Station UNC staff use CB803, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, United States. Electronic address: cai@bios.unc.edu.Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611, United States. Electronic address: a-giachello@northwestern.edu.Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, 450 Fourth Ave, Suite 400, Chula Vista, CA 91910, United States. Electronic address: gtalavera@mail.sdsu.edu.National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20982, United States. Electronic address: CowieC@Extra.niddk.nih.gov.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27956225

Citation

Avilés-Santa, M Larissa, et al. "Detecting Prediabetes Among Hispanics/Latinos From Diverse Heritage Groups: Does the Test Matter? Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos." Preventive Medicine, vol. 95, 2017, pp. 110-118.
Avilés-Santa ML, Pérez CM, Schneiderman N, et al. Detecting prediabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups: Does the test matter? Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Prev Med. 2017;95:110-118.
Avilés-Santa, M. L., Pérez, C. M., Schneiderman, N., Savage, P. J., Kaplan, R. C., Teng, Y., Suárez, E. L., Cai, J., Giachello, A. L., Talavera, G. A., & Cowie, C. C. (2017). Detecting prediabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups: Does the test matter? Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Preventive Medicine, 95, 110-118. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.12.009
Avilés-Santa ML, et al. Detecting Prediabetes Among Hispanics/Latinos From Diverse Heritage Groups: Does the Test Matter? Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Prev Med. 2017;95:110-118. PubMed PMID: 27956225.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detecting prediabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups: Does the test matter? Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. AU - Avilés-Santa,M Larissa, AU - Pérez,Cynthia M, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, AU - Savage,Peter J, AU - Kaplan,Robert C, AU - Teng,Yanping, AU - Suárez,Erick L, AU - Cai,Jianwen, AU - Giachello,Aida L, AU - Talavera,Gregory A, AU - Cowie,Catherine C, Y1 - 2016/12/10/ PY - 2016/08/10/received PY - 2016/11/17/revised PY - 2016/12/07/accepted PY - 2016/12/14/pubmed PY - 2017/11/1/medline PY - 2016/12/14/entrez KW - Hispanics KW - Hypertension KW - LDL cholesterol KW - Latinos KW - Obesity KW - Prediabetic state KW - Triglycerides SP - 110 EP - 118 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 95 N2 - The objectives of this analysis were to compare the ability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post oral load plasma glucose (2hPG), and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to identify U.S. Hispanic/Latino individuals with prediabetes, and to assess its cardiovascular risk factor correlates. This is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 15,507 adults without self-reported diabetes mellitus from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which takes place in four U.S. communities. The prevalence of prediabetes was determined according to individual or combinations of ADA-defined cut points: FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L, 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, and HbA1c=5.7%-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). The sensitivity of these criteria to detect prediabetes was estimated. The prevalence ratios (PRs) for selected cardiovascular risk factors were compared among alternative categories of prediabetes versus normoglycemia [FPG<5.6mmol/L and 2hPG<7.8mmol/L and HbA1c<5.7% (39mmol/mol)]. Approximately 36% of individuals met any of the ADA prediabetes criteria. Using 2hPG as the gold standard, the sensitivity of FPG was 40.1%, HbA1c was 45.6%, and that of HbA1c+FPG was 62.2%. The number of significant PRs for cardiovascular risk factors was higher among individuals with isolated 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L+HbA1c=5.7%-6.4%, or those who met the three prediabetes criteria. Assessing FPG, HbA1c, and cardiovascular risk factors in Hispanics/Latinos at risk might enhance the early prevention of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular complications in this young and growing population, independent of their heritage group. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27956225/Detecting_prediabetes_among_Hispanics/Latinos_from_diverse_heritage_groups:_Does_the_test_matter_Findings_from_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(16)30404-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -