Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates from Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to In Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production.
J Nutr. 2017 02; 147(2):264-271.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It has been assumed that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the colon originate mainly from dietary fiber fermentation. However, SCFAs in the colon are also produced from the fermentation of nondietary material.

OBJECTIVES

We aimed to predict the relative contributions of dietary and nondietary substrates in the production of SCFAs with the use of a human fecal inoculum for diets containing kiwifruit as a model fiber.

METHODS

Terminal ileal digesta were collected from ileal-cannulated male pigs [n = 7; mean ± SD: 41.4 ± 2.98 kg body weight] adapted (44-d feeding) to diets containing either 25 g/kg dry matter (DM) of kiwifruit fiber (KFf) (25 KFf) or 50 g/kg DM of KFf (50 KFf) and then again after receiving a fiber-free diet (n = 14) for a further 7 d. Pigs were used as a model for adult humans for digestion in the upper digestive tract (mouth to the terminal ileum). The ileal digesta (either unfractionated or fractionated into crude mucin and microbial fractions) were fermented in vitro for 24 h with the use of a fresh human fecal inoculum to predict SCFA production in the human hindgut.

RESULTS

SCFAs of nondietary origin were the main source (65%) of total SCFAs predicted to be produced in the human hindgut. The contribution of SCFAs from KFf was only 26% of the total SCFAs, and that from total dietary material was 35%. The higher contribution of nondietary material to total predicted SCFA production was observed at both dietary fiber concentrations. Predicted SCFA intake from dietary fiber was 76 and 105 mmol/kg diet DM intake for the diets containing 25 KFf and 50 KFf, respectively, and from the nondietary substrates it was 178 and 280 mmol/kg diet DM intake, respectively.

CONCLUSION

A considerable proportion of the SCFAs produced in the human hindgut seems to be derived from the fermentation of nondietary substrates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, and c.montoya@massey.ac.nz. Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, and. Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28003537

Citation

Montoya, Carlos A., et al. "Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates From Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to in Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 147, no. 2, 2017, pp. 264-271.
Montoya CA, Rutherfurd SM, Moughan PJ. Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates from Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to In Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production. J Nutr. 2017;147(2):264-271.
Montoya, C. A., Rutherfurd, S. M., & Moughan, P. J. (2017). Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates from Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to In Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production. The Journal of Nutrition, 147(2), 264-271. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.240564
Montoya CA, Rutherfurd SM, Moughan PJ. Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates From Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to in Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production. J Nutr. 2017;147(2):264-271. PubMed PMID: 28003537.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ileal Digesta Nondietary Substrates from Cannulated Pigs Are Major Contributors to In Vitro Human Hindgut Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production. AU - Montoya,Carlos A, AU - Rutherfurd,Shane M, AU - Moughan,Paul J, Y1 - 2016/12/21/ PY - 2016/08/15/received PY - 2016/09/19/revised PY - 2016/11/18/accepted PY - 2016/12/23/pubmed PY - 2017/5/24/medline PY - 2016/12/23/entrez KW - SCFAs KW - dietary fiber KW - hindgut fermentation KW - kiwifruit KW - nondietary materials SP - 264 EP - 271 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 147 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: It has been assumed that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the colon originate mainly from dietary fiber fermentation. However, SCFAs in the colon are also produced from the fermentation of nondietary material. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to predict the relative contributions of dietary and nondietary substrates in the production of SCFAs with the use of a human fecal inoculum for diets containing kiwifruit as a model fiber. METHODS: Terminal ileal digesta were collected from ileal-cannulated male pigs [n = 7; mean ± SD: 41.4 ± 2.98 kg body weight] adapted (44-d feeding) to diets containing either 25 g/kg dry matter (DM) of kiwifruit fiber (KFf) (25 KFf) or 50 g/kg DM of KFf (50 KFf) and then again after receiving a fiber-free diet (n = 14) for a further 7 d. Pigs were used as a model for adult humans for digestion in the upper digestive tract (mouth to the terminal ileum). The ileal digesta (either unfractionated or fractionated into crude mucin and microbial fractions) were fermented in vitro for 24 h with the use of a fresh human fecal inoculum to predict SCFA production in the human hindgut. RESULTS: SCFAs of nondietary origin were the main source (65%) of total SCFAs predicted to be produced in the human hindgut. The contribution of SCFAs from KFf was only 26% of the total SCFAs, and that from total dietary material was 35%. The higher contribution of nondietary material to total predicted SCFA production was observed at both dietary fiber concentrations. Predicted SCFA intake from dietary fiber was 76 and 105 mmol/kg diet DM intake for the diets containing 25 KFf and 50 KFf, respectively, and from the nondietary substrates it was 178 and 280 mmol/kg diet DM intake, respectively. CONCLUSION: A considerable proportion of the SCFAs produced in the human hindgut seems to be derived from the fermentation of nondietary substrates. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28003537/Ileal_Digesta_Nondietary_Substrates_from_Cannulated_Pigs_Are_Major_Contributors_to_In_Vitro_Human_Hindgut_Short_Chain_Fatty_Acid_Production_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.116.240564 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -