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Age and the experience of strong self-conscious emotion.
Aging Ment Health. 2018 04; 22(4):497-502.AM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

It remains unclear whether there are age-related changes in the experience of strong self-conscious emotion, such as shame, guilt, pride and embarrassment. Because shame and guilt figure prominently in the aetiology of depressive symptoms and other mental health problems, a better understanding of how age affects the strong experience of these two negative self-conscious emotions is of particular importance.

METHODS

Thirty younger, 30 middle-aged and 30 older adults were compared on standardised cognitive assessments, in addition to an interview-based measure that assessed whether there are age differences in the likelihood of strongly experiencing four different types of self-conscious emotion within the past five years (shame, guilt, embarrassment and pride).

RESULTS

The three groups did not differ in their likelihood of reporting an event that strongly elicited the positive self-conscious emotion of pride. However, older adults were more likely to report sources of pride that were other (as opposed to self) focused. Older adults were also less likely to report experiencing events that elicited all three negative self-conscious emotions, in particular, shame.

CONCLUSIONS

Strong negative self-conscious emotion, and in particular shame, appears to be experienced less by older than younger adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a School of Psychology , University of Queensland , St Lucia , Australia.a School of Psychology , University of Queensland , St Lucia , Australia.b School of Dentistry , University of Queensland , Herston , Australia.a School of Psychology , University of Queensland , St Lucia , Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28006977

Citation

Henry, Julie D., et al. "Age and the Experience of Strong Self-conscious Emotion." Aging & Mental Health, vol. 22, no. 4, 2018, pp. 497-502.
Henry JD, von Hippel W, Nangle MR, et al. Age and the experience of strong self-conscious emotion. Aging Ment Health. 2018;22(4):497-502.
Henry, J. D., von Hippel, W., Nangle, M. R., & Waters, M. (2018). Age and the experience of strong self-conscious emotion. Aging & Mental Health, 22(4), 497-502. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2016.1268094
Henry JD, et al. Age and the Experience of Strong Self-conscious Emotion. Aging Ment Health. 2018;22(4):497-502. PubMed PMID: 28006977.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age and the experience of strong self-conscious emotion. AU - Henry,Julie D, AU - von Hippel,William, AU - Nangle,Matthew R, AU - Waters,Michele, Y1 - 2016/12/22/ PY - 2016/12/23/pubmed PY - 2019/8/20/medline PY - 2016/12/24/entrez KW - Self-conscious emotion KW - autobiographical recall KW - mental health KW - shame SP - 497 EP - 502 JF - Aging & mental health JO - Aging Ment Health VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: It remains unclear whether there are age-related changes in the experience of strong self-conscious emotion, such as shame, guilt, pride and embarrassment. Because shame and guilt figure prominently in the aetiology of depressive symptoms and other mental health problems, a better understanding of how age affects the strong experience of these two negative self-conscious emotions is of particular importance. METHODS: Thirty younger, 30 middle-aged and 30 older adults were compared on standardised cognitive assessments, in addition to an interview-based measure that assessed whether there are age differences in the likelihood of strongly experiencing four different types of self-conscious emotion within the past five years (shame, guilt, embarrassment and pride). RESULTS: The three groups did not differ in their likelihood of reporting an event that strongly elicited the positive self-conscious emotion of pride. However, older adults were more likely to report sources of pride that were other (as opposed to self) focused. Older adults were also less likely to report experiencing events that elicited all three negative self-conscious emotions, in particular, shame. CONCLUSIONS: Strong negative self-conscious emotion, and in particular shame, appears to be experienced less by older than younger adults. SN - 1364-6915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28006977/Age_and_the_experience_of_strong_self_conscious_emotion_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -