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Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis.
Arthroscopy 2017; 33(5):929-937A

Abstract

PURPOSE

To describe a modified technique for arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon in a selected group of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis and to evaluate its short-term results.

METHODS

Fifteen patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis treated by arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer were included. The mean patient age was 61.53 ± 6.24 years (range, 52-71 years). Patients were assessed with physical examination, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Score and Constant-Murley score, as well as visual analog scale score at a mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 2.58 months (range, 24-31 months).

RESULTS

At final follow-up, mean UCLA score increased to 27.47 ± 6.31 compared with the preoperative UCLA score of 6.53 ± 2.1 (P < .001). Constant-Murley score was 21 ± 7.41 and 59.73 ± 13.62 (P < .001), visual analog scale pain score was 7.47 ± 1.06 and 2.47 ± 0.91 (P < .001), active forward flexion was 58° ± 21.11° and 130° ± 30.05° (P < .001), active abduction was 51° ± 21.64° and 129.67° ± 25.45° (P < .001), and active external rotation was 13.33° ± 21.68° and 32° ± 18.03° (P < .001) preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. Mean acromiohumeral distance was 3.13 ± 1.40 mm preoperatively, whereas it was 5.67 ± 1.67 mm postoperatively (P < .001). No significant complications requiring a revision surgery was observed during the final follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

The modified technique of arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon is a feasible, minimally invasive option for the surgical treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears in a subset of patients with pseudoparalysis.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

Level IV, therapeutic case series.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Necmettin Erbakan University Meram School of Medicine, Konya, Turkey. Electronic address: mozer208@yahoo.com.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, Trabzon, Turkey.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Erzincan University Mengucek Gazi Training and Research Hospital, Erzincan, Turkey.Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28024870

Citation

Kanatlı, Ulunay, et al. "Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis." Arthroscopy : the Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery : Official Publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association, vol. 33, no. 5, 2017, pp. 929-937.
Kanatlı U, Özer M, Ataoğlu MB, et al. Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis. Arthroscopy. 2017;33(5):929-937.
Kanatlı, U., Özer, M., Ataoğlu, M. B., Öztürk, B. Y., Gül, O., Çetinkaya, M., & Ayanoğlu, T. (2017). Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis. Arthroscopy : the Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery : Official Publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association, 33(5), pp. 929-937. doi:10.1016/j.arthro.2016.09.023.
Kanatlı U, et al. Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis. Arthroscopy. 2017;33(5):929-937. PubMed PMID: 28024870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis. AU - Kanatlı,Ulunay, AU - Özer,Mustafa, AU - Ataoğlu,Muhammet Baybars, AU - Öztürk,Burak Yağmur, AU - Gül,Orkun, AU - Çetinkaya,Mehmet, AU - Ayanoğlu,Tacettin, Y1 - 2016/12/23/ PY - 2016/04/10/received PY - 2016/09/20/revised PY - 2016/09/26/accepted PY - 2016/12/28/pubmed PY - 2018/1/3/medline PY - 2016/12/28/entrez SP - 929 EP - 937 JF - Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association JO - Arthroscopy VL - 33 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To describe a modified technique for arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon in a selected group of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis and to evaluate its short-term results. METHODS: Fifteen patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis treated by arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer were included. The mean patient age was 61.53 ± 6.24 years (range, 52-71 years). Patients were assessed with physical examination, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Score and Constant-Murley score, as well as visual analog scale score at a mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 2.58 months (range, 24-31 months). RESULTS: At final follow-up, mean UCLA score increased to 27.47 ± 6.31 compared with the preoperative UCLA score of 6.53 ± 2.1 (P < .001). Constant-Murley score was 21 ± 7.41 and 59.73 ± 13.62 (P < .001), visual analog scale pain score was 7.47 ± 1.06 and 2.47 ± 0.91 (P < .001), active forward flexion was 58° ± 21.11° and 130° ± 30.05° (P < .001), active abduction was 51° ± 21.64° and 129.67° ± 25.45° (P < .001), and active external rotation was 13.33° ± 21.68° and 32° ± 18.03° (P < .001) preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. Mean acromiohumeral distance was 3.13 ± 1.40 mm preoperatively, whereas it was 5.67 ± 1.67 mm postoperatively (P < .001). No significant complications requiring a revision surgery was observed during the final follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The modified technique of arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon is a feasible, minimally invasive option for the surgical treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears in a subset of patients with pseudoparalysis. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic case series. SN - 1526-3231 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28024870/Arthroscopic_Assisted_Latissimus_Dorsi_Tendon_Transfer_for_Massive_Irreparable_Rotator_Cuff_Tears:_Technique_and_Short_Term_Follow_Up_of_Patients_With_Pseudoparalysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-8063(16)30779-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -