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Improving aerobic capacity in healthy older adults does not necessarily lead to improved cognitive performance.

Abstract

The effects of aerobic exercise training in a sample of 85 older adults were investigated. Ss were assigned randomly to either an aerobic exercise group, a nonaerobic exercise (yoga) group, or a waiting-list control group. Following 16 weeks of the group-specific protocol, all of the older Ss received 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. The older adults demonstrated a significant increase in aerobic capacity (cardiorespiratory fitness). Performance on reaction-time tests of attention and memory retrieval was slower for the older adults than for a comparison group of 24 young adults, and there was no improvement in the older adults' performance on these tests as a function of aerobic exercise training. Results suggest that exercise-related changes in older adults' cognitive performance are due either to extended periods of training or to cohort differences between physically active and sedentary individuals.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center.

    , ,

    Source

    Psychology and aging 4:3 1989 Sep pg 307-20

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Attention
    Cognition
    Discrimination Learning
    Exercise
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Mental Recall
    Middle Aged
    Pattern Recognition, Visual
    Physical Fitness
    Reaction Time
    Wechsler Scales

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    2803624

    Citation

    Madden, D J., et al. "Improving Aerobic Capacity in Healthy Older Adults Does Not Necessarily Lead to Improved Cognitive Performance." Psychology and Aging, vol. 4, no. 3, 1989, pp. 307-20.
    Madden DJ, Blumenthal JA, Allen PA, et al. Improving aerobic capacity in healthy older adults does not necessarily lead to improved cognitive performance. Psychol Aging. 1989;4(3):307-20.
    Madden, D. J., Blumenthal, J. A., Allen, P. A., & Emery, C. F. (1989). Improving aerobic capacity in healthy older adults does not necessarily lead to improved cognitive performance. Psychology and Aging, 4(3), pp. 307-20.
    Madden DJ, et al. Improving Aerobic Capacity in Healthy Older Adults Does Not Necessarily Lead to Improved Cognitive Performance. Psychol Aging. 1989;4(3):307-20. PubMed PMID: 2803624.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Improving aerobic capacity in healthy older adults does not necessarily lead to improved cognitive performance. AU - Madden,D J, AU - Blumenthal,J A, AU - Allen,P A, AU - Emery,C F, PY - 1989/9/1/pubmed PY - 1989/9/1/medline PY - 1989/9/1/entrez SP - 307 EP - 20 JF - Psychology and aging JO - Psychol Aging VL - 4 IS - 3 N2 - The effects of aerobic exercise training in a sample of 85 older adults were investigated. Ss were assigned randomly to either an aerobic exercise group, a nonaerobic exercise (yoga) group, or a waiting-list control group. Following 16 weeks of the group-specific protocol, all of the older Ss received 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. The older adults demonstrated a significant increase in aerobic capacity (cardiorespiratory fitness). Performance on reaction-time tests of attention and memory retrieval was slower for the older adults than for a comparison group of 24 young adults, and there was no improvement in the older adults' performance on these tests as a function of aerobic exercise training. Results suggest that exercise-related changes in older adults' cognitive performance are due either to extended periods of training or to cohort differences between physically active and sedentary individuals. SN - 0882-7974 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2803624/Improving_aerobic_capacity_in_healthy_older_adults_does_not_necessarily_lead_to_improved_cognitive_performance_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pag/4/3/307 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -