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A qualitative study investigating training requirements of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes.
Nurse Educ Today. 2017 Mar; 50:119-123.NE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The care home workforce (over half a million people in the UK) has a pivotal role in the quality of care provided to the residents. Much care in this setting is inadequate, lacks a person-centred focus and neglects the dignity of residents. A combination of factors leads to burnout in nurses working in nursing homes, contributing to poor quality care. Recent reports have indicated that cultures of care need to be addressed through training, improved workforce support and supervision and that improving the quality of care for people with dementia can be achieved by the development of leadership in nursing and clarifying professional values. Addressing burnout through an educational intervention should improve quality of care and nurses' experiences.

OBJECTIVES

The study aimed to explore the training needs of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes with a view to developing an educational intervention to reduce nurses' burnout and improve person-centred care.

DESIGN

Four focus groups were conducted with 11 qualified nurses working in nursing homes; data was analysed using thematic analysis.

RESULTS

Four themes emerged through the analysis of the transcripts. Participants reported that their work responsibilities revolved mainly around directing others, day to day care, paper work and supporting family carers. Nurses identified the importance of person-centred ways of being, communication and clinical skills when working in nursing home setting. They expressed their frustrations associated with managing staff levels, responding to behaviour that challenges and lack of time.

CONCLUSIONS

The barriers to learning, experience of previous training and gaps in knowledge identified could inform the design of future training and support programmes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

BSMHFT, 25 Vincent Drive, Edgbaston B15 2FG, United Kingdom. Electronic address: analisa.smythe@bsmhft.nhs.uk.Birmingham City University, United Kingdom.BSMHFT, United Kingdom.BSMHFT, United Kingdom.Dementia Care, Bradford Dementia Group, School of Health Studies, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28043078

Citation

Smythe, Analisa, et al. "A Qualitative Study Investigating Training Requirements of Nurses Working With People With Dementia in Nursing Homes." Nurse Education Today, vol. 50, 2017, pp. 119-123.
Smythe A, Jenkins C, Galant-Miecznikowska M, et al. A qualitative study investigating training requirements of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes. Nurse Educ Today. 2017;50:119-123.
Smythe, A., Jenkins, C., Galant-Miecznikowska, M., Bentham, P., & Oyebode, J. (2017). A qualitative study investigating training requirements of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes. Nurse Education Today, 50, 119-123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2016.12.015
Smythe A, et al. A Qualitative Study Investigating Training Requirements of Nurses Working With People With Dementia in Nursing Homes. Nurse Educ Today. 2017;50:119-123. PubMed PMID: 28043078.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A qualitative study investigating training requirements of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes. AU - Smythe,Analisa, AU - Jenkins,Catharine, AU - Galant-Miecznikowska,Magdalena, AU - Bentham,Peter, AU - Oyebode,Jan, Y1 - 2016/12/22/ PY - 2016/08/10/received PY - 2016/11/15/revised PY - 2016/12/13/accepted PY - 2017/1/4/pubmed PY - 2019/3/21/medline PY - 2017/1/3/entrez KW - Dementia KW - Nurses KW - Nursing homes KW - Training SP - 119 EP - 123 JF - Nurse education today JO - Nurse Educ Today VL - 50 N2 - BACKGROUND: The care home workforce (over half a million people in the UK) has a pivotal role in the quality of care provided to the residents. Much care in this setting is inadequate, lacks a person-centred focus and neglects the dignity of residents. A combination of factors leads to burnout in nurses working in nursing homes, contributing to poor quality care. Recent reports have indicated that cultures of care need to be addressed through training, improved workforce support and supervision and that improving the quality of care for people with dementia can be achieved by the development of leadership in nursing and clarifying professional values. Addressing burnout through an educational intervention should improve quality of care and nurses' experiences. OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to explore the training needs of nurses working with people with dementia in nursing homes with a view to developing an educational intervention to reduce nurses' burnout and improve person-centred care. DESIGN: Four focus groups were conducted with 11 qualified nurses working in nursing homes; data was analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four themes emerged through the analysis of the transcripts. Participants reported that their work responsibilities revolved mainly around directing others, day to day care, paper work and supporting family carers. Nurses identified the importance of person-centred ways of being, communication and clinical skills when working in nursing home setting. They expressed their frustrations associated with managing staff levels, responding to behaviour that challenges and lack of time. CONCLUSIONS: The barriers to learning, experience of previous training and gaps in knowledge identified could inform the design of future training and support programmes. SN - 1532-2793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28043078/A_qualitative_study_investigating_training_requirements_of_nurses_working_with_people_with_dementia_in_nursing_homes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0260-6917(16)30317-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -