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Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.
BMC Immunol. 2017 01 06; 18(1):2.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health.

METHODS

This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

RESULTS

In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS

A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Bioengineering, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009, People's Republic of China. linl04@seu.edu.cn.Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Ministry of Education, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009, People's Republic of China. zhjq@seu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28061847

Citation

Lin, Lan, and Jianqiong Zhang. "Role of Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolites On Gut Homeostasis and Human Diseases." BMC Immunology, vol. 18, no. 1, 2017, p. 2.
Lin L, Zhang J. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases. BMC Immunol. 2017;18(1):2.
Lin, L., & Zhang, J. (2017). Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases. BMC Immunology, 18(1), 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12865-016-0187-3
Lin L, Zhang J. Role of Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolites On Gut Homeostasis and Human Diseases. BMC Immunol. 2017 01 6;18(1):2. PubMed PMID: 28061847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases. AU - Lin,Lan, AU - Zhang,Jianqiong, Y1 - 2017/01/06/ PY - 2016/07/27/received PY - 2016/12/20/accepted PY - 2017/1/8/entrez PY - 2017/1/8/pubmed PY - 2017/10/7/medline KW - Dendritic cells (DCs) KW - Gut homeostasis KW - Immune responses KW - Intestinal microbiota KW - Metabolic disorder KW - Regulatory T cells (Tregs) SP - 2 EP - 2 JF - BMC immunology JO - BMC Immunol VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. METHODS: This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RESULTS: In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment. SN - 1471-2172 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28061847/Role_of_intestinal_microbiota_and_metabolites_on_gut_homeostasis_and_human_diseases_ L2 - https://bmcimmunol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12865-016-0187-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -