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Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study.
Gastroenterology. 2017 04; 152(5):1023-1030.e2.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Dietary fiber is implicated as a risk factor for diverticulitis. Analyses of dietary patterns may provide information on risk beyond those of individual foods or nutrients. We examined whether major dietary patterns are associated with risk of incident diverticulitis.

METHODS

We performed a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men who were free of diverticulitis and known diverticulosis in 1986 (baseline) using data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Each study participant completed a detailed medical and dietary questionnaire at baseline. We sent supplemental questionnaires to men reporting incident diverticulitis on biennial follow-up questionnaires. We assessed diet every 4 years using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Western (high in red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy) and prudent (high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Follow-up time accrued from the date of return of the baseline questionnaire in 1986 until a diagnosis of diverticulitis, diverticulosis or diverticular bleeding; death; or December 31, 2012. The primary end point was incident diverticulitis.

RESULTS

During 894,468 person years of follow-up, we identified 1063 incident cases of diverticulitis. After adjustment for other risk factors, men in the highest quintile of Western dietary pattern score had a multivariate hazard ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.20-1.99) for diverticulitis compared to men in the lowest quintile. High vs low prudent scores were associated with decreased risk of diverticulitis (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.91). The association between dietary patterns and diverticulitis was predominantly attributable to intake of fiber and red meat.

CONCLUSIONS

In a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men, a Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of diverticulitis, and a prudent pattern was associated with decreased risk. These data can guide dietary interventions for the prevention of diverticulitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Electronic address: lstrate@uw.edu.Departent of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28065788

Citation

Strate, Lisa L., et al. "Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study." Gastroenterology, vol. 152, no. 5, 2017, pp. 1023-1030.e2.
Strate LL, Keeley BR, Cao Y, et al. Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study. Gastroenterology. 2017;152(5):1023-1030.e2.
Strate, L. L., Keeley, B. R., Cao, Y., Wu, K., Giovannucci, E. L., & Chan, A. T. (2017). Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study. Gastroenterology, 152(5), 1023-e2. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2016.12.038
Strate LL, et al. Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study. Gastroenterology. 2017;152(5):1023-1030.e2. PubMed PMID: 28065788.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Western Dietary Pattern Increases, and Prudent Dietary Pattern Decreases, Risk of Incident Diverticulitis in a Prospective Cohort Study. AU - Strate,Lisa L, AU - Keeley,Brieze R, AU - Cao,Yin, AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Chan,Andrew T, Y1 - 2017/01/05/ PY - 2016/06/21/received PY - 2016/12/21/revised PY - 2016/12/22/accepted PY - 2017/1/10/pubmed PY - 2017/6/14/medline PY - 2017/1/10/entrez KW - Alternative Healthy Eating Index KW - Diverticular Disease KW - HPFS KW - PCA SP - 1023 EP - 1030.e2 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 152 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Dietary fiber is implicated as a risk factor for diverticulitis. Analyses of dietary patterns may provide information on risk beyond those of individual foods or nutrients. We examined whether major dietary patterns are associated with risk of incident diverticulitis. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men who were free of diverticulitis and known diverticulosis in 1986 (baseline) using data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Each study participant completed a detailed medical and dietary questionnaire at baseline. We sent supplemental questionnaires to men reporting incident diverticulitis on biennial follow-up questionnaires. We assessed diet every 4 years using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Western (high in red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy) and prudent (high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Follow-up time accrued from the date of return of the baseline questionnaire in 1986 until a diagnosis of diverticulitis, diverticulosis or diverticular bleeding; death; or December 31, 2012. The primary end point was incident diverticulitis. RESULTS: During 894,468 person years of follow-up, we identified 1063 incident cases of diverticulitis. After adjustment for other risk factors, men in the highest quintile of Western dietary pattern score had a multivariate hazard ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.20-1.99) for diverticulitis compared to men in the lowest quintile. High vs low prudent scores were associated with decreased risk of diverticulitis (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.91). The association between dietary patterns and diverticulitis was predominantly attributable to intake of fiber and red meat. CONCLUSIONS: In a prospective cohort study of 46,295 men, a Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of diverticulitis, and a prudent pattern was associated with decreased risk. These data can guide dietary interventions for the prevention of diverticulitis. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28065788/Western_Dietary_Pattern_Increases_and_Prudent_Dietary_Pattern_Decreases_Risk_of_Incident_Diverticulitis_in_a_Prospective_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(17)30006-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -