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Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect on the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin.
Otol Neurotol. 2017 04; 38(4):599-605.ON

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The correlation between the isosorbide-induced decompression effect on the endolymphatic space and plasma osmolality (p-OSM) or plasma arginine vasopressin (p-AVP) was investigated on comparing two different dosages of isosorbide (2.8 and 1.4 g/kg) to elucidate why the decompression effect is delayed with a large dose of isosorbide.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Two experiments were performed using 80 guinea pigs. Experiment 1 was designed to morphologically investigate the sequential influence of the oral intake of 1.4- and 2.8-g/kg doses of isosorbide on the endolymphatic volume. The animals used were 50 guinea pigs (control: 10, experimental: 40). All animals underwent surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic sac of the left ear. One month after the surgery, control animals were sacrificed 3 hours after the intake of distilled water, and experimental animals were sacrificed 3 and 6 hours after the isosorbide intake. All of the left temporal bone served for the quantitative assessment of changes in the endolymphatic space, and the cross-sectional area of the scala media was measured from the mid-modiolar sections of the cochlea.Experiment 2 was designed to investigate changes in p-OSM and p-AVP levels 3 hours after the oral intake of isosorbide. Animals used were 15 guinea pigs (control: 5, experimental: 10). The control group received the oral administration of distilled water (4 ml/kg), and the experimental animals were subdivided into two groups consisting of 10 animals each by the dosage of isosorbide (1.4 or 2.8 g/kg). All animals were sacrificed for the measurement of p-OSM and p-AVP concentrations 3 hours after the intake of water or 70% isosorbide solution.

RESULTS

Morphologically, an isosorbide-induced decompression effect was noted in animals with both 1.4- and 2.8-g/kg doses of isosorbide. According to the regression analysis, however, the volumetric decrease of the endolymphatic space was more evident in cases with the small dose (1.4 g/kg) 3 hours after the intake (analysis of covariance [ANCOVA], p < 0.001). Six hours after, the decompression effect was significantly greater in cases with the large dose (2.8 g/kg) (ANCOVA, p < 0.001).Isosorbide intake caused a rise in p-OSM levels dose-dependently. The Cochran-Cox test revealed that the differences in the mean values among control and isosorbide groups were significant (p < 0.01). Regarding the p-AVP level, a significant increase was evident in cases with the large dose (2.8 g/kg) (p < 0.01, Cochran-Cox test), and not in cases with the small dose (1.4 g/kg).

CONCLUSION

An isosorbide-induced decompression effect of the endolymphatic space was evident in spite of two different dosages of isosorbide (2.8 and 1.4 g/kg). Three hours after the isosorbide intake, however, the decompression effect was more marked in the group with the small dose (1.4 g/kg). Since significant rises in p-OSM and p-AVP were evident in the group with the large dose, this early rise of p-AVP due to dehydration seems to be the major reason for the delayed decompression effect in cases with a large isosorbide intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Department of Otolaryngology, Nishinomiya Municipal Central Hospital †Nishinomiya ‡Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe University, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28072656

Citation

Takeda, Taizo, et al. "Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect On the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin." Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, vol. 38, no. 4, 2017, pp. 599-605.
Takeda T, Takeda S, Uehara N, et al. Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect on the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin. Otol Neurotol. 2017;38(4):599-605.
Takeda, T., Takeda, S., Uehara, N., Yanagisawa, S., Furukawa, T., Nibu, K. I., & Kakigi, A. (2017). Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect on the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin. Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 38(4), 599-605. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001333
Takeda T, et al. Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect On the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin. Otol Neurotol. 2017;38(4):599-605. PubMed PMID: 28072656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Isosorbide-Induced Decompression Effect on the Scala Media: Participation of Plasma Osmolality and Plasma Arginine Vasopressin. AU - Takeda,Taizo, AU - Takeda,Setsuko, AU - Uehara,Natsumi, AU - Yanagisawa,Shungaku, AU - Furukawa,Tatsuya, AU - Nibu,Ken-Ichi, AU - Kakigi,Akinobu, PY - 2017/1/11/pubmed PY - 2017/9/9/medline PY - 2017/1/11/entrez SP - 599 EP - 605 JF - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology JO - Otol Neurotol VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The correlation between the isosorbide-induced decompression effect on the endolymphatic space and plasma osmolality (p-OSM) or plasma arginine vasopressin (p-AVP) was investigated on comparing two different dosages of isosorbide (2.8 and 1.4 g/kg) to elucidate why the decompression effect is delayed with a large dose of isosorbide. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two experiments were performed using 80 guinea pigs. Experiment 1 was designed to morphologically investigate the sequential influence of the oral intake of 1.4- and 2.8-g/kg doses of isosorbide on the endolymphatic volume. The animals used were 50 guinea pigs (control: 10, experimental: 40). All animals underwent surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic sac of the left ear. One month after the surgery, control animals were sacrificed 3 hours after the intake of distilled water, and experimental animals were sacrificed 3 and 6 hours after the isosorbide intake. All of the left temporal bone served for the quantitative assessment of changes in the endolymphatic space, and the cross-sectional area of the scala media was measured from the mid-modiolar sections of the cochlea.Experiment 2 was designed to investigate changes in p-OSM and p-AVP levels 3 hours after the oral intake of isosorbide. Animals used were 15 guinea pigs (control: 5, experimental: 10). The control group received the oral administration of distilled water (4 ml/kg), and the experimental animals were subdivided into two groups consisting of 10 animals each by the dosage of isosorbide (1.4 or 2.8 g/kg). All animals were sacrificed for the measurement of p-OSM and p-AVP concentrations 3 hours after the intake of water or 70% isosorbide solution. RESULTS: Morphologically, an isosorbide-induced decompression effect was noted in animals with both 1.4- and 2.8-g/kg doses of isosorbide. According to the regression analysis, however, the volumetric decrease of the endolymphatic space was more evident in cases with the small dose (1.4 g/kg) 3 hours after the intake (analysis of covariance [ANCOVA], p < 0.001). Six hours after, the decompression effect was significantly greater in cases with the large dose (2.8 g/kg) (ANCOVA, p < 0.001).Isosorbide intake caused a rise in p-OSM levels dose-dependently. The Cochran-Cox test revealed that the differences in the mean values among control and isosorbide groups were significant (p < 0.01). Regarding the p-AVP level, a significant increase was evident in cases with the large dose (2.8 g/kg) (p < 0.01, Cochran-Cox test), and not in cases with the small dose (1.4 g/kg). CONCLUSION: An isosorbide-induced decompression effect of the endolymphatic space was evident in spite of two different dosages of isosorbide (2.8 and 1.4 g/kg). Three hours after the isosorbide intake, however, the decompression effect was more marked in the group with the small dose (1.4 g/kg). Since significant rises in p-OSM and p-AVP were evident in the group with the large dose, this early rise of p-AVP due to dehydration seems to be the major reason for the delayed decompression effect in cases with a large isosorbide intake. SN - 1537-4505 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28072656/Isosorbide_Induced_Decompression_Effect_on_the_Scala_Media:_Participation_of_Plasma_Osmolality_and_Plasma_Arginine_Vasopressin_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001333 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -