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The application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide to a sample of Swiss patients attending a psychiatric emergency department for a non-lethal suicidal event.
J Affect Disord. 2017 Mar 01; 210:323-331.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Visits to emergency departments (EDs) for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt have increased in the past decades. Yet comprehensive models of suicide are scarce, potentially enhancing misunderstandings from health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the applicability of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in a population visiting EDs for suicide-related issues.

METHODS

Three major hypotheses formulated by the IPTS were tested in a sample of 167 individuals visiting EDs for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt.

RESULTS

As predicted by the IPTS, greater levels of perceived burdensomeness (PB) were associated with presence of current suicidal ideation. However, contrary to the theory assumptions, thwarted belongingness (TB) was not predictive of current suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 1). Similarly, the interaction between PB, TB and hopelessness did not account for the transition from passive to active suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 2). The interaction between active suicidal ideation and fearlessness of death did not either predict the transition from active suicidal ideation to suicidal intent (Hypothesis 3).

LIMITATIONS

The cross-sectional design limited the interpretation of causal hypotheses. Patients visiting EDs during nights and weekends were underrepresented. A general measure of hopelessness was considered, not a measure of hopelessness specifically related to PB and TB.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the three hypotheses were only partially verified, health professionals might consider the IPTS as useful for the management of patient with suicide-related issues. Clinical intervention based on perceived burdensomeness could notably be proposed shortly after ED admission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nant Foundation, Vaud East Psychiatric Institute, Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland. Electronic address: marc.baertschi@nant.ch.Service of Liaison Psychiatry and Crisis Intervention, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.Service of Psychiatry Specialties, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.Suicide Prevention Center, Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.Emergency Department, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.Service of Liaison Psychiatry and Crisis Intervention, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.Nant Foundation, Vaud East Psychiatric Institute, Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28073040

Citation

Baertschi, Marc, et al. "The Application of the Interpersonal-psychological Theory of Suicide to a Sample of Swiss Patients Attending a Psychiatric Emergency Department for a Non-lethal Suicidal Event." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 210, 2017, pp. 323-331.
Baertschi M, Costanza A, Richard-Lepouriel H, et al. The application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide to a sample of Swiss patients attending a psychiatric emergency department for a non-lethal suicidal event. J Affect Disord. 2017;210:323-331.
Baertschi, M., Costanza, A., Richard-Lepouriel, H., Pompili, M., Sarasin, F., Weber, K., & Canuto, A. (2017). The application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide to a sample of Swiss patients attending a psychiatric emergency department for a non-lethal suicidal event. Journal of Affective Disorders, 210, 323-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.12.049
Baertschi M, et al. The Application of the Interpersonal-psychological Theory of Suicide to a Sample of Swiss Patients Attending a Psychiatric Emergency Department for a Non-lethal Suicidal Event. J Affect Disord. 2017 Mar 1;210:323-331. PubMed PMID: 28073040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide to a sample of Swiss patients attending a psychiatric emergency department for a non-lethal suicidal event. AU - Baertschi,Marc, AU - Costanza,Alessandra, AU - Richard-Lepouriel,Hélène, AU - Pompili,Maurizio, AU - Sarasin,François, AU - Weber,Kerstin, AU - Canuto,Alessandra, Y1 - 2017/01/03/ PY - 2016/07/25/received PY - 2016/12/18/revised PY - 2016/12/31/accepted PY - 2017/1/11/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2017/1/11/entrez KW - Acquired capability for suicide KW - Interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide KW - Perceived burdensomeness KW - Suicidal ideation KW - Suicide attempt KW - Thwarted belongingness SP - 323 EP - 331 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 210 N2 - BACKGROUND: Visits to emergency departments (EDs) for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt have increased in the past decades. Yet comprehensive models of suicide are scarce, potentially enhancing misunderstandings from health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the applicability of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in a population visiting EDs for suicide-related issues. METHODS: Three major hypotheses formulated by the IPTS were tested in a sample of 167 individuals visiting EDs for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt. RESULTS: As predicted by the IPTS, greater levels of perceived burdensomeness (PB) were associated with presence of current suicidal ideation. However, contrary to the theory assumptions, thwarted belongingness (TB) was not predictive of current suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 1). Similarly, the interaction between PB, TB and hopelessness did not account for the transition from passive to active suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 2). The interaction between active suicidal ideation and fearlessness of death did not either predict the transition from active suicidal ideation to suicidal intent (Hypothesis 3). LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design limited the interpretation of causal hypotheses. Patients visiting EDs during nights and weekends were underrepresented. A general measure of hopelessness was considered, not a measure of hopelessness specifically related to PB and TB. CONCLUSIONS: Although the three hypotheses were only partially verified, health professionals might consider the IPTS as useful for the management of patient with suicide-related issues. Clinical intervention based on perceived burdensomeness could notably be proposed shortly after ED admission. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28073040/The_application_of_the_interpersonal_psychological_theory_of_suicide_to_a_sample_of_Swiss_patients_attending_a_psychiatric_emergency_department_for_a_non_lethal_suicidal_event_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(16)31272-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -