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The influence of calorie and physical activity labelling on snack and beverage choices.
Appetite 2017; 112:52-58A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Much research suggests nutrition labelling does not influence lower energy food choice. This study aimed to assess the impact of physical activity based and kilocalorie (Kcal) based labels on the energy content of snack food and beverage choices made.

METHODS

An independent-groups design, utilizing an online questionnaire platform tested 458 UK adults (87 men), aged 18-64 years (mean: 30 years) whose BMI ranged from 16 to 41 kg/m2 (mean: 24 kg/m2). Participants were randomized to one of four label information conditions (no label, Kcal label, physical activity label [duration of walking required to burn the Kcal in the product], Kcal and physical activity label) and were asked to choose from higher and lower energy options for a series of items.

RESULTS

Label condition significantly affected low vs. high-energy product selection of snack foods (p < 0.001) and beverages (p < 0.001). The physical activity label condition resulted in significantly lower energy snack and beverage choices than the Kcal label condition (p < 0.001). This effect was found across the full sample and persisted even when participants' dietary restraint, BMI, gender, socioeconomic status, habitual physical activity, calorie and numerical literacy were controlled.

CONCLUSION

The provision of physical activity information appeared most effective in influencing the selection of lower Kcal snack food and beverage items, when compared with no information or Kcal information. These findings could inform the debate around potential legislative policies to facilitate healthier nutritional choices at a population level.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological Sciences, Eleanor Rathbone Building, Bedford Street South, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZA, UK. Electronic address: u.masic@liverpool.ac.uk.Department of Psychological Sciences, Eleanor Rathbone Building, Bedford Street South, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZA, UK.Department of Psychological Sciences, Eleanor Rathbone Building, Bedford Street South, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZA, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28082195

Citation

Masic, U, et al. "The Influence of Calorie and Physical Activity Labelling On Snack and Beverage Choices." Appetite, vol. 112, 2017, pp. 52-58.
Masic U, Christiansen P, Boyland EJ. The influence of calorie and physical activity labelling on snack and beverage choices. Appetite. 2017;112:52-58.
Masic, U., Christiansen, P., & Boyland, E. J. (2017). The influence of calorie and physical activity labelling on snack and beverage choices. Appetite, 112, pp. 52-58. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2017.01.007.
Masic U, Christiansen P, Boyland EJ. The Influence of Calorie and Physical Activity Labelling On Snack and Beverage Choices. Appetite. 2017 05 1;112:52-58. PubMed PMID: 28082195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of calorie and physical activity labelling on snack and beverage choices. AU - Masic,U, AU - Christiansen,P, AU - Boyland,E J, Y1 - 2017/01/10/ PY - 2016/06/24/received PY - 2017/01/05/revised PY - 2017/01/07/accepted PY - 2017/1/14/pubmed PY - 2018/1/3/medline PY - 2017/1/14/entrez KW - Beverage choice KW - Energy intake KW - Exercise KW - Food choice KW - Nutrition labelling KW - Snack choice SP - 52 EP - 58 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 112 N2 - BACKGROUND: Much research suggests nutrition labelling does not influence lower energy food choice. This study aimed to assess the impact of physical activity based and kilocalorie (Kcal) based labels on the energy content of snack food and beverage choices made. METHODS: An independent-groups design, utilizing an online questionnaire platform tested 458 UK adults (87 men), aged 18-64 years (mean: 30 years) whose BMI ranged from 16 to 41 kg/m2 (mean: 24 kg/m2). Participants were randomized to one of four label information conditions (no label, Kcal label, physical activity label [duration of walking required to burn the Kcal in the product], Kcal and physical activity label) and were asked to choose from higher and lower energy options for a series of items. RESULTS: Label condition significantly affected low vs. high-energy product selection of snack foods (p < 0.001) and beverages (p < 0.001). The physical activity label condition resulted in significantly lower energy snack and beverage choices than the Kcal label condition (p < 0.001). This effect was found across the full sample and persisted even when participants' dietary restraint, BMI, gender, socioeconomic status, habitual physical activity, calorie and numerical literacy were controlled. CONCLUSION: The provision of physical activity information appeared most effective in influencing the selection of lower Kcal snack food and beverage items, when compared with no information or Kcal information. These findings could inform the debate around potential legislative policies to facilitate healthier nutritional choices at a population level. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28082195/The_influence_of_calorie_and_physical_activity_labelling_on_snack_and_beverage_choices_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(17)30028-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -