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Self-reported physical activity behavior of breast cancer survivors during and after adjuvant therapy: 12 months follow-up of two randomized exercise intervention trials.
Acta Oncol 2017; 56(4):618-627AO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exercise during and after breast cancer treatment has shown several health benefits. However, little is known about the courses, patterns, and determinants of physical activity of breast cancer patients, and the role of exercise interventions on their physical activity behavior in the long run.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Self-reported physical activity was assessed in 227 breast cancer survivors before, during, and three, six, and 12 months post-intervention within two randomized resistance exercise trials performed during adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy, respectively, with similar designs. Multiple ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to identify determinants of physical activity at these time points.

RESULTS

While the intervention group exercised a median 1.8 h/week during adjuvant therapy (interquartile range 1.4-2.5), 68% of controls did not engage in any exercise. At 12-months follow-up 32% of patients did not engage in any exercise irrespective of the intervention. Of the patients who cycled for transportation pre-diagnosis about half stopped cycling in the long term in both groups. In contrast, walking was maintained over time. Major determinants of low levels of exercise at 12-months follow-up were low pre-diagnosis levels of exercise, lower education, being postmenopausal, and having breast problems or depressive symptoms. Further, the intervention appeared to influence the type of sports performed, with strength exercise being the most common type of exercise at follow-up in the exercise group, more frequently compared to the control group.

CONCLUSION

The exercise intervention effectively countervailed the decrease in physical activity during cancer therapy and boosted strength exercise in the months following the intervention, but in the longer term many survivors were insufficiently active. Breast cancer survivors may need continued motivation and practical support tailored to their individual characteristics and physical activity history to incorporate exercise in everyday routine in the long term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Division of Physical Activity, Prevention and Cancer , National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) , Heidelberg , Germany.b Division of Medical Oncology , National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and Heidelberg University Hospital , Heidelberg , Germany.c Department of Population Health Sciences , Huntsman Cancer Institute and University of Utah , Salt Lake City , UT , USA.d Division Gynecologic Oncology , National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and University Hospital , Heidelberg , Germany.a Division of Physical Activity, Prevention and Cancer , National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) , Heidelberg , Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28084890

Citation

Schmidt, Martina E., et al. "Self-reported Physical Activity Behavior of Breast Cancer Survivors During and After Adjuvant Therapy: 12 Months Follow-up of Two Randomized Exercise Intervention Trials." Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden), vol. 56, no. 4, 2017, pp. 618-627.
Schmidt ME, Wiskemann J, Ulrich CM, et al. Self-reported physical activity behavior of breast cancer survivors during and after adjuvant therapy: 12 months follow-up of two randomized exercise intervention trials. Acta Oncol. 2017;56(4):618-627.
Schmidt, M. E., Wiskemann, J., Ulrich, C. M., Schneeweiss, A., & Steindorf, K. (2017). Self-reported physical activity behavior of breast cancer survivors during and after adjuvant therapy: 12 months follow-up of two randomized exercise intervention trials. Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden), 56(4), pp. 618-627. doi:10.1080/0284186X.2016.1275776.
Schmidt ME, et al. Self-reported Physical Activity Behavior of Breast Cancer Survivors During and After Adjuvant Therapy: 12 Months Follow-up of Two Randomized Exercise Intervention Trials. Acta Oncol. 2017;56(4):618-627. PubMed PMID: 28084890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported physical activity behavior of breast cancer survivors during and after adjuvant therapy: 12 months follow-up of two randomized exercise intervention trials. AU - Schmidt,Martina E, AU - Wiskemann,Joachim, AU - Ulrich,Cornelia M, AU - Schneeweiss,Andreas, AU - Steindorf,Karen, Y1 - 2017/01/13/ PY - 2017/1/14/pubmed PY - 2017/4/26/medline PY - 2017/1/14/entrez SP - 618 EP - 627 JF - Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) JO - Acta Oncol VL - 56 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Exercise during and after breast cancer treatment has shown several health benefits. However, little is known about the courses, patterns, and determinants of physical activity of breast cancer patients, and the role of exercise interventions on their physical activity behavior in the long run. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Self-reported physical activity was assessed in 227 breast cancer survivors before, during, and three, six, and 12 months post-intervention within two randomized resistance exercise trials performed during adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy, respectively, with similar designs. Multiple ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to identify determinants of physical activity at these time points. RESULTS: While the intervention group exercised a median 1.8 h/week during adjuvant therapy (interquartile range 1.4-2.5), 68% of controls did not engage in any exercise. At 12-months follow-up 32% of patients did not engage in any exercise irrespective of the intervention. Of the patients who cycled for transportation pre-diagnosis about half stopped cycling in the long term in both groups. In contrast, walking was maintained over time. Major determinants of low levels of exercise at 12-months follow-up were low pre-diagnosis levels of exercise, lower education, being postmenopausal, and having breast problems or depressive symptoms. Further, the intervention appeared to influence the type of sports performed, with strength exercise being the most common type of exercise at follow-up in the exercise group, more frequently compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: The exercise intervention effectively countervailed the decrease in physical activity during cancer therapy and boosted strength exercise in the months following the intervention, but in the longer term many survivors were insufficiently active. Breast cancer survivors may need continued motivation and practical support tailored to their individual characteristics and physical activity history to incorporate exercise in everyday routine in the long term. SN - 1651-226X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28084890/Self_reported_physical_activity_behavior_of_breast_cancer_survivors_during_and_after_adjuvant_therapy:_12_months_follow_up_of_two_randomized_exercise_intervention_trials_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0284186X.2016.1275776 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -