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Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth.
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Feb; 60(2):176-183.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess if adolescent dating violence was associated with physical intimate partner violence victimization in adulthood, using a comprehensive propensity score to create a matched group of victims and nonvictims.

METHODS

Secondary analysis of waves 1 (1994-1995), 2 (1996), 3 (2001-2002) and 4 (2007-2008) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of US high schools and middle schools. Individuals aged 12-18 reporting adolescent dating violence between the wave 1 and 2 interviews (n = 732) were matched to nonvictimized participants of the same sex (n = 1,429) using propensity score matching. These participants were followed up approximately 5 (wave 3) and 12 (wave 4) years later. At both follow-up points, physical violence victimization by a current partner was assessed. Data were analyzed using path models.

RESULTS

Compared with the matched no victimization group, individuals reporting adolescent dating violence were more likely to experience physical intimate partner violence approximately 12 years later (wave 4), through the experience of 5-year (wave 3) victimization. This path held for males and females.

CONCLUSIONS

Results from this sample matched on key risk variables suggest that violence first experienced in adolescent relationships may become chronic, confirming adolescent dating violence as an important risk factor for adult partner violence. Findings from this study underscore the critical role of primary and secondary prevention for adolescent dating violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Development and Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. Electronic address: deinera.exner2@ucalgary.ca.Department of Human Development and Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.Department of Statistical Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28109451

Citation

Exner-Cortens, Deinera, et al. "Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 60, no. 2, 2017, pp. 176-183.
Exner-Cortens D, Eckenrode J, Bunge J, et al. Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth. J Adolesc Health. 2017;60(2):176-183.
Exner-Cortens, D., Eckenrode, J., Bunge, J., & Rothman, E. (2017). Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 60(2), 176-183. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.09.015
Exner-Cortens D, et al. Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth. J Adolesc Health. 2017;60(2):176-183. PubMed PMID: 28109451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Revictimization After Adolescent Dating Violence in a Matched, National Sample of Youth. AU - Exner-Cortens,Deinera, AU - Eckenrode,John, AU - Bunge,John, AU - Rothman,Emily, PY - 2016/05/24/received PY - 2016/09/14/revised PY - 2016/09/15/accepted PY - 2017/1/23/entrez PY - 2017/1/23/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline KW - Adolescent dating violence KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Propensity score matching SP - 176 EP - 183 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess if adolescent dating violence was associated with physical intimate partner violence victimization in adulthood, using a comprehensive propensity score to create a matched group of victims and nonvictims. METHODS: Secondary analysis of waves 1 (1994-1995), 2 (1996), 3 (2001-2002) and 4 (2007-2008) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of US high schools and middle schools. Individuals aged 12-18 reporting adolescent dating violence between the wave 1 and 2 interviews (n = 732) were matched to nonvictimized participants of the same sex (n = 1,429) using propensity score matching. These participants were followed up approximately 5 (wave 3) and 12 (wave 4) years later. At both follow-up points, physical violence victimization by a current partner was assessed. Data were analyzed using path models. RESULTS: Compared with the matched no victimization group, individuals reporting adolescent dating violence were more likely to experience physical intimate partner violence approximately 12 years later (wave 4), through the experience of 5-year (wave 3) victimization. This path held for males and females. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this sample matched on key risk variables suggest that violence first experienced in adolescent relationships may become chronic, confirming adolescent dating violence as an important risk factor for adult partner violence. Findings from this study underscore the critical role of primary and secondary prevention for adolescent dating violence. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28109451/Revictimization_After_Adolescent_Dating_Violence_in_a_Matched_National_Sample_of_Youth_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(16)30359-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -