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Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models.
J Surg Educ 2017 Jul - Aug; 74(4):681-689JS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Recently, there have been increasingly fewer opportunities for junior surgeons to receive on-the-job training. Therefore, we created custom-built three-dimensional (3D) surgical simulators for training in connection with cerebral aneurysm clipping.

METHODS

Three patient-specific models were composed of a trimmed skull, retractable brain, and a hollow elastic aneurysm with its parent artery. The brain models were created using 3D printers via a casting technique. The artery models were made by 3D printing and a lost-wax technique. Four residents and 2 junior neurosurgeons attended the training courses. The trainees retracted the brain, observed the parent arteries and aneurysmal neck, selected the clip(s), and clipped the neck of an aneurysm. The duration of simulation was recorded. A senior neurosurgeon then assessed the trainee's technical skill and explained how to improve his/her performance for the procedure using a video of the actual surgery. Subsequently, the trainee attempted the clipping simulation again, using the same model. After the course, the senior neurosurgeon assessed each trainee's technical skill. The trainee critiqued the usefulness of the model and the effectiveness of the training course.

RESULTS

Trainees succeeded in performing the simulation in line with an actual surgery. Their skills tended to improve upon completion of the training.

CONCLUSION

These simulation models are easy to create, and we believe that they are very useful for training junior neurosurgeons in the surgical techniques needed for cerebral aneurysm clipping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke Tochigi, Japan. Electronic address: mashiko@jichi.ac.jp.Department of Neurosurgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke Tochigi, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke Tochigi, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Aomori, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke Tochigi, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke Tochigi, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28110854

Citation

Mashiko, Toshihiro, et al. "Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models." Journal of Surgical Education, vol. 74, no. 4, 2017, pp. 681-689.
Mashiko T, Kaneko N, Konno T, et al. Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models. J Surg Educ. 2017;74(4):681-689.
Mashiko, T., Kaneko, N., Konno, T., Otani, K., Nagayama, R., & Watanabe, E. (2017). Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models. Journal of Surgical Education, 74(4), pp. 681-689. doi:10.1016/j.jsurg.2016.12.010.
Mashiko T, et al. Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models. J Surg Educ. 2017;74(4):681-689. PubMed PMID: 28110854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Training in Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Using Self-Made 3-Dimensional Models. AU - Mashiko,Toshihiro, AU - Kaneko,Naoki, AU - Konno,Takehiko, AU - Otani,Keisuke, AU - Nagayama,Rie, AU - Watanabe,Eiju, Y1 - 2017/01/16/ PY - 2016/07/18/received PY - 2016/11/12/revised PY - 2016/12/22/accepted PY - 2017/1/24/pubmed PY - 2018/5/22/medline PY - 2017/1/24/entrez KW - 3D model KW - 3D printing KW - Medical Knowledge KW - Practice-Based Learning KW - Systems-Based Practice KW - aneurysm clipping KW - cerebral aneurysm KW - simulator KW - simulator training SP - 681 EP - 689 JF - Journal of surgical education JO - J Surg Educ VL - 74 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Recently, there have been increasingly fewer opportunities for junior surgeons to receive on-the-job training. Therefore, we created custom-built three-dimensional (3D) surgical simulators for training in connection with cerebral aneurysm clipping. METHODS: Three patient-specific models were composed of a trimmed skull, retractable brain, and a hollow elastic aneurysm with its parent artery. The brain models were created using 3D printers via a casting technique. The artery models were made by 3D printing and a lost-wax technique. Four residents and 2 junior neurosurgeons attended the training courses. The trainees retracted the brain, observed the parent arteries and aneurysmal neck, selected the clip(s), and clipped the neck of an aneurysm. The duration of simulation was recorded. A senior neurosurgeon then assessed the trainee's technical skill and explained how to improve his/her performance for the procedure using a video of the actual surgery. Subsequently, the trainee attempted the clipping simulation again, using the same model. After the course, the senior neurosurgeon assessed each trainee's technical skill. The trainee critiqued the usefulness of the model and the effectiveness of the training course. RESULTS: Trainees succeeded in performing the simulation in line with an actual surgery. Their skills tended to improve upon completion of the training. CONCLUSION: These simulation models are easy to create, and we believe that they are very useful for training junior neurosurgeons in the surgical techniques needed for cerebral aneurysm clipping. SN - 1878-7452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28110854/Training_in_Cerebral_Aneurysm_Clipping_Using_Self_Made_3_Dimensional_Models_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1931-7204(16)30387-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -