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Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients with Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Apr; 96(4):791-794.AJ

Abstract

AbstractA Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) may be precipitated after initiation of chemotherapy in spirochetal diseases, including leptospirosis. However, a clear idea of the importance of JHR in this disease is lacking. The incidence of and risk factors for JHR were investigated retrospectively among 262 patients with confirmed leptospirosis who received amoxicillin treatment in New Caledonia and Futuna. The overall rate of JHR was 21% (12% in New Caledonia and 44% in Futuna). Two risk factors were independently associated with JHR occurrence: Leptospira interrogans serogroup Australis as the infecting strain (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60, confidence interval [CI] = 1.40-5.62) and delays < 3 days between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of antibiotherapy (OR = 2.14, CI = 1.11-4.38). Clinicians should be aware of JHR as a potential complication of leptospirosis. Strain-related factors associated with JHR occurrence and its impact on outcome remains to be explored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Anesthésie-réanimation, Hopital Cochin, Paris, France.Service de médecine, Centre Hospitalier du Nord, Koumac, New Caledonia.Dispensaire de Futuna, Agence de Santé, Alo, Futuna.Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Cire Océan Indien, Saint-Denis, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28115662

Citation

Guerrier, Gilles, et al. "Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients With Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 96, no. 4, 2017, pp. 791-794.
Guerrier G, Lefèvre P, Chouvin C, et al. Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients with Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;96(4):791-794.
Guerrier, G., Lefèvre, P., Chouvin, C., & D'Ortenzio, E. (2017). Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients with Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 96(4), 791-794. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0457
Guerrier G, et al. Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients With Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;96(4):791-794. PubMed PMID: 28115662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction Among Patients with Leptospirosis: Incidence and Risk Factors. AU - Guerrier,Gilles, AU - Lefèvre,Patrick, AU - Chouvin,Chantal, AU - D'Ortenzio,Eric, Y1 - 2017/01/23/ PY - 2017/1/25/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline PY - 2017/1/25/entrez SP - 791 EP - 794 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 96 IS - 4 N2 - AbstractA Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) may be precipitated after initiation of chemotherapy in spirochetal diseases, including leptospirosis. However, a clear idea of the importance of JHR in this disease is lacking. The incidence of and risk factors for JHR were investigated retrospectively among 262 patients with confirmed leptospirosis who received amoxicillin treatment in New Caledonia and Futuna. The overall rate of JHR was 21% (12% in New Caledonia and 44% in Futuna). Two risk factors were independently associated with JHR occurrence: Leptospira interrogans serogroup Australis as the infecting strain (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60, confidence interval [CI] = 1.40-5.62) and delays < 3 days between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of antibiotherapy (OR = 2.14, CI = 1.11-4.38). Clinicians should be aware of JHR as a potential complication of leptospirosis. Strain-related factors associated with JHR occurrence and its impact on outcome remains to be explored. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28115662/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0457?crawler=true&amp;mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -