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Use of ultrasound by registered nurses-a systematic literature review.
J Ren Care. 2017 Sep; 43(3):132-142.JR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In Western Australia (WA), most stable patients undergoing haemodialysis receive treatment in a satellite setting where no doctors are on-site during treatment hours, so nurses must make critical decisions about fluid removal. Some patients regularly experience adverse events during dialysis (intradialytic), often due to excessive ultrafiltration goals, with intradialytic hypotension being particularly challenging. Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava has been previously demonstrated being a rapid and non-invasive method for volume assessment on haemodialysis patients, thus could hold valuable information for the treating nurse.

AIM

This paper examines the existing literature in regards to the use of ultrasound measurements of the inferior vena cava in patients on haemodialysis for objective assessment of their intravascular volume status by renal nurses.

METHOD

A systematic literature review was performed within medical and nursing databases including CINAHL Plus with Full Text, SCOPUS, Web of Science and MEDLINE.

RESULTS

Renal nurses are conscious of the significance of intradialytic hypotension and have only limited options for its prevention. Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava could add another objective dimension for intravascular volume assessment and prevention of intradialytic hypotension, but to date renal nurses have not been using this technique.

CONCLUSIONS

Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava has the potential to assist in defining the ultrafiltration goal for that particular dialysis session, thus reducing the risk of intradialytic hypotension. Additionally, it has potential to change current renal nursing practice when added to clinical nursing assessment methods. Further studies are required to validate this assessment tool carried out by a renal nurse compared with a skilled ultrasonographer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Emergency Medicine, School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care, The University of Western Australia, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.School of Medicine, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28120381

Citation

Steinwandel, Ulrich, et al. "Use of Ultrasound By Registered Nurses-a Systematic Literature Review." Journal of Renal Care, vol. 43, no. 3, 2017, pp. 132-142.
Steinwandel U, Gibson NP, Rippey JC, et al. Use of ultrasound by registered nurses-a systematic literature review. J Ren Care. 2017;43(3):132-142.
Steinwandel, U., Gibson, N. P., Rippey, J. C., Towell, A., & Rosman, J. (2017). Use of ultrasound by registered nurses-a systematic literature review. Journal of Renal Care, 43(3), 132-142. https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12191
Steinwandel U, et al. Use of Ultrasound By Registered Nurses-a Systematic Literature Review. J Ren Care. 2017;43(3):132-142. PubMed PMID: 28120381.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of ultrasound by registered nurses-a systematic literature review. AU - Steinwandel,Ulrich, AU - Gibson,Nicholas P, AU - Rippey,James Charles, AU - Towell,Amanda, AU - Rosman,Johan, Y1 - 2017/01/25/ PY - 2017/1/26/pubmed PY - 2018/5/22/medline PY - 2017/1/26/entrez KW - Haemodialysis KW - Intradialytic hypotension KW - Nursing competency KW - Ultrasound inferior vena cava SP - 132 EP - 142 JF - Journal of renal care JO - J Ren Care VL - 43 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: In Western Australia (WA), most stable patients undergoing haemodialysis receive treatment in a satellite setting where no doctors are on-site during treatment hours, so nurses must make critical decisions about fluid removal. Some patients regularly experience adverse events during dialysis (intradialytic), often due to excessive ultrafiltration goals, with intradialytic hypotension being particularly challenging. Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava has been previously demonstrated being a rapid and non-invasive method for volume assessment on haemodialysis patients, thus could hold valuable information for the treating nurse. AIM: This paper examines the existing literature in regards to the use of ultrasound measurements of the inferior vena cava in patients on haemodialysis for objective assessment of their intravascular volume status by renal nurses. METHOD: A systematic literature review was performed within medical and nursing databases including CINAHL Plus with Full Text, SCOPUS, Web of Science and MEDLINE. RESULTS: Renal nurses are conscious of the significance of intradialytic hypotension and have only limited options for its prevention. Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava could add another objective dimension for intravascular volume assessment and prevention of intradialytic hypotension, but to date renal nurses have not been using this technique. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound of the inferior vena cava has the potential to assist in defining the ultrafiltration goal for that particular dialysis session, thus reducing the risk of intradialytic hypotension. Additionally, it has potential to change current renal nursing practice when added to clinical nursing assessment methods. Further studies are required to validate this assessment tool carried out by a renal nurse compared with a skilled ultrasonographer. SN - 1755-6686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28120381/Use_of_ultrasound_by_registered_nurses_a_systematic_literature_review_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12191 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -