Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The relative reinforcing value of sweet versus savory snack foods after consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive sweetened beverages.
Appetite. 2017 05 01; 112:143-149.A

Abstract

The effects of sugar-sweetened (SSB) and non-nutritive sweetened (NSB) beverages on the regulation of appetite, energy intake and body weight regulation remain controversial. Using a behavioral choice paradigm, we sought to determine the effects of consuming a SSB or NSB on appetite and the reinforcing value of sweet relative to salty/savory snack foods. In a randomized crossover study, 21 healthy weight adults consumed 360 ml of SSB (sucrose; 31 g) or NSB (sucralose; 4 g) with a standardized meal. Hedonic ratings for the sweet and salty/savory snack foods used for the reinforcement task were assessed prior to the start of the study. Satiety and the desire to eat foods with a specific taste profile were assessed before and every 30 min post-meal for 4 h. The relative reinforcing value of the snack foods was assessed using a computer-based choice task (operant responding with concurrent schedules of reinforcement) 4 h post-meal. Hedonic ratings did not differ between the most highly liked sweet and salty/savory snack foods. Beverage type did not influence measures of satiety or the desire to eat foods with a specific taste. However, sweet snacks were more (p < 0.05) reinforcing relative to salty/savory snack foods after consuming a NSB than after a SSB. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that NSB can increase the motivation to gain access to sweet snacks relative to salty/savory snack foods later in the day.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 2420 2nd Ave. North, Grand Forks, ND, 58203-9034, USA. Electronic address: shanon.casperson@ars.usda.gov.USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 2420 2nd Ave. North, Grand Forks, ND, 58203-9034, USA.USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 2420 2nd Ave. North, Grand Forks, ND, 58203-9034, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28126491

Citation

Casperson, Shanon L., et al. "The Relative Reinforcing Value of Sweet Versus Savory Snack Foods After Consumption of Sugar- or Non-nutritive Sweetened Beverages." Appetite, vol. 112, 2017, pp. 143-149.
Casperson SL, Johnson L, Roemmich JN. The relative reinforcing value of sweet versus savory snack foods after consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive sweetened beverages. Appetite. 2017;112:143-149.
Casperson, S. L., Johnson, L., & Roemmich, J. N. (2017). The relative reinforcing value of sweet versus savory snack foods after consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive sweetened beverages. Appetite, 112, 143-149. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.01.028
Casperson SL, Johnson L, Roemmich JN. The Relative Reinforcing Value of Sweet Versus Savory Snack Foods After Consumption of Sugar- or Non-nutritive Sweetened Beverages. Appetite. 2017 05 1;112:143-149. PubMed PMID: 28126491.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relative reinforcing value of sweet versus savory snack foods after consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive sweetened beverages. AU - Casperson,Shanon L, AU - Johnson,LuAnn, AU - Roemmich,James N, Y1 - 2017/01/23/ PY - 2016/09/21/received PY - 2016/12/07/revised PY - 2017/01/21/accepted PY - 2017/1/28/pubmed PY - 2018/1/3/medline PY - 2017/1/28/entrez KW - Food reinforcement KW - Non-nutritive sweetened KW - Snack foods KW - Sugar-sweetened KW - “Diet” drinks SP - 143 EP - 149 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 112 N2 - The effects of sugar-sweetened (SSB) and non-nutritive sweetened (NSB) beverages on the regulation of appetite, energy intake and body weight regulation remain controversial. Using a behavioral choice paradigm, we sought to determine the effects of consuming a SSB or NSB on appetite and the reinforcing value of sweet relative to salty/savory snack foods. In a randomized crossover study, 21 healthy weight adults consumed 360 ml of SSB (sucrose; 31 g) or NSB (sucralose; 4 g) with a standardized meal. Hedonic ratings for the sweet and salty/savory snack foods used for the reinforcement task were assessed prior to the start of the study. Satiety and the desire to eat foods with a specific taste profile were assessed before and every 30 min post-meal for 4 h. The relative reinforcing value of the snack foods was assessed using a computer-based choice task (operant responding with concurrent schedules of reinforcement) 4 h post-meal. Hedonic ratings did not differ between the most highly liked sweet and salty/savory snack foods. Beverage type did not influence measures of satiety or the desire to eat foods with a specific taste. However, sweet snacks were more (p < 0.05) reinforcing relative to salty/savory snack foods after consuming a NSB than after a SSB. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that NSB can increase the motivation to gain access to sweet snacks relative to salty/savory snack foods later in the day. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28126491/The_relative_reinforcing_value_of_sweet_versus_savory_snack_foods_after_consumption_of_sugar__or_non_nutritive_sweetened_beverages_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(17)30110-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -