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Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants.
Tree Physiol. 2017 05 01; 37(5):654-664.TP

Abstract

In order to clarify whether high linalool content in citrus leaves alone induces strong field resistance to citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), and to assess whether this trait can be transferred to a citrus type highly sensitive to the bacterium, transgenic 'Hamlin' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) plants over-expressing a linalool synthase gene (CuSTS3-1) were generated. Transgenic lines (LIL) with the highest linalool content showed strong resistance to citrus canker when spray inoculated with the bacterium. In LIL plants inoculated by wounding (multiple-needle inoculation), the linalool level was correlated with the repression of the bacterial titer and up-regulation of defense-related genes. The exogenous application of salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate or linalool triggered responses similar to those constitutively induced in LIL plants. The linalool content in Ponkan mandarin leaves was significantly higher than that of leaves from six other representative citrus genotypes with different susceptibilities to Xcc. We propose that linalool-mediated resistance might be unique to citrus tissues accumulating large amounts of volatile organic compounds in oil cells. Linalool might act not only as a direct antibacterial agent, but also as a signal molecule involved in triggering a non-host resistance response against Xcc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science (NIFTS), National Agriculture and Bio-Oriented Research Organization (NARO), Shizuoka 424-0292, Japan.Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science (NIFTS), National Agriculture and Bio-Oriented Research Organization (NARO), Shizuoka 424-0292, Japan.Fundecitrus, Av. Dr. Adhemar de Barros Pereira, 201, 14807-040 Vila Melhado, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (IBMCP/CSIC-UPV), Ingeniero Fausto Elio, Valencia 46022, Spain.Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science (NIFTS), National Agriculture and Bio-Oriented Research Organization (NARO), Shizuoka 424-0292, Japan.Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science (NIFTS), National Agriculture and Bio-Oriented Research Organization (NARO), Shizuoka 424-0292, Japan.Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Chuo 2-20-1, Kurashiki 710-0046, Japan.Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Chuo 2-20-1, Kurashiki 710-0046, Japan.Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Chuo 2-20-1, Kurashiki 710-0046, Japan.Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Chuo 2-20-1, Kurashiki 710-0046, Japan.Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science (NIFTS), National Agriculture and Bio-Oriented Research Organization (NARO), Shizuoka 424-0292, Japan.Fundecitrus, Av. Dr. Adhemar de Barros Pereira, 201, 14807-040 Vila Melhado, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (IBMCP/CSIC-UPV), Ingeniero Fausto Elio, Valencia 46022, Spain.Faculty of Agriculture, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28131994

Citation

Shimada, Takehiko, et al. "Ectopic Accumulation of Linalool Confers Resistance to Xanthomonas Citri Subsp. Citri in Transgenic Sweet Orange Plants." Tree Physiology, vol. 37, no. 5, 2017, pp. 654-664.
Shimada T, Endo T, Rodríguez A, et al. Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants. Tree Physiol. 2017;37(5):654-664.
Shimada, T., Endo, T., Rodríguez, A., Fujii, H., Goto, S., Matsuura, T., Hojo, Y., Ikeda, Y., Mori, I. C., Fujikawa, T., Peña, L., & Omura, M. (2017). Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants. Tree Physiology, 37(5), 654-664. https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpw134
Shimada T, et al. Ectopic Accumulation of Linalool Confers Resistance to Xanthomonas Citri Subsp. Citri in Transgenic Sweet Orange Plants. Tree Physiol. 2017 05 1;37(5):654-664. PubMed PMID: 28131994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants. AU - Shimada,Takehiko, AU - Endo,Tomoko, AU - Rodríguez,Ana, AU - Fujii,Hiroshi, AU - Goto,Shingo, AU - Matsuura,Takakazu, AU - Hojo,Yuko, AU - Ikeda,Yoko, AU - Mori,Izumi C, AU - Fujikawa,Takashi, AU - Peña,Leandro, AU - Omura,Mitsuo, PY - 2016/08/05/received PY - 2017/01/05/accepted PY - 2017/1/31/pubmed PY - 2018/1/20/medline PY - 2017/1/30/entrez KW - canker KW - citrus KW - non-host resistance KW - systematic acquired resistance SP - 654 EP - 664 JF - Tree physiology JO - Tree Physiol. VL - 37 IS - 5 N2 - In order to clarify whether high linalool content in citrus leaves alone induces strong field resistance to citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), and to assess whether this trait can be transferred to a citrus type highly sensitive to the bacterium, transgenic 'Hamlin' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) plants over-expressing a linalool synthase gene (CuSTS3-1) were generated. Transgenic lines (LIL) with the highest linalool content showed strong resistance to citrus canker when spray inoculated with the bacterium. In LIL plants inoculated by wounding (multiple-needle inoculation), the linalool level was correlated with the repression of the bacterial titer and up-regulation of defense-related genes. The exogenous application of salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate or linalool triggered responses similar to those constitutively induced in LIL plants. The linalool content in Ponkan mandarin leaves was significantly higher than that of leaves from six other representative citrus genotypes with different susceptibilities to Xcc. We propose that linalool-mediated resistance might be unique to citrus tissues accumulating large amounts of volatile organic compounds in oil cells. Linalool might act not only as a direct antibacterial agent, but also as a signal molecule involved in triggering a non-host resistance response against Xcc. SN - 1758-4469 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28131994/Ectopic_accumulation_of_linalool_confers_resistance_to_Xanthomonas_citri_subsp__citri_in_transgenic_sweet_orange_plants_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/treephys/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/treephys/tpw134 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -