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Non-deployment factors affecting psychological wellbeing in military personnel: literature review.
J Ment Health. 2018 Feb; 27(1):80-90.JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Most military mental health research focuses on the impact of deployment-related stress; less is known about how everyday work-related factors affect wellbeing.

AIMS

This systematic narrative literature review aimed to identify non-deployment-related factors contributing to the wellbeing of military personnel.

METHOD

Electronic literature databases were searched and the findings of relevant studies were used to explore non-deployment-related risk and resilience factors.

RESULTS

Fifty publications met the inclusion criteria. Determinants of non-deployment stress were identified as: relationships with others (including leadership/supervisory support; social support/cohesion; harassment/discrimination) and role-related stressors (role conflict; commitment and effort-reward imbalance; work overload/job demands; family-related issues/work-life balance; and other factors including control/autonomy, physical work environment and financial strain). Factors positively impacting wellbeing (such as exercise) were also identified.

CONCLUSIONS

The literature suggests that non-deployment stressors present a significant occupational health hazard in routine military environments and interpersonal relationships at work are of fundamental importance. Findings suggest that in order to protect the wellbeing of personnel and improve performance, military organisations should prioritise strengthening relationships between employees and their supervisors/colleagues. Recommendations for addressing these stressors in British military personnel were developed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a King's College London, King's Centre for Military Health Research, Weston Education Centre , London , UK.a King's College London, King's Centre for Military Health Research, Weston Education Centre , London , UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28132582

Citation

Brooks, Samantha K., and Neil Greenberg. "Non-deployment Factors Affecting Psychological Wellbeing in Military Personnel: Literature Review." Journal of Mental Health (Abingdon, England), vol. 27, no. 1, 2018, pp. 80-90.
Brooks SK, Greenberg N. Non-deployment factors affecting psychological wellbeing in military personnel: literature review. J Ment Health. 2018;27(1):80-90.
Brooks, S. K., & Greenberg, N. (2018). Non-deployment factors affecting psychological wellbeing in military personnel: literature review. Journal of Mental Health (Abingdon, England), 27(1), 80-90. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638237.2016.1276536
Brooks SK, Greenberg N. Non-deployment Factors Affecting Psychological Wellbeing in Military Personnel: Literature Review. J Ment Health. 2018;27(1):80-90. PubMed PMID: 28132582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-deployment factors affecting psychological wellbeing in military personnel: literature review. AU - Brooks,Samantha K, AU - Greenberg,Neil, Y1 - 2017/01/28/ PY - 2017/1/31/pubmed PY - 2018/7/22/medline PY - 2017/1/31/entrez KW - Military KW - leadership KW - management KW - organisational culture KW - social support SP - 80 EP - 90 JF - Journal of mental health (Abingdon, England) JO - J Ment Health VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Most military mental health research focuses on the impact of deployment-related stress; less is known about how everyday work-related factors affect wellbeing. AIMS: This systematic narrative literature review aimed to identify non-deployment-related factors contributing to the wellbeing of military personnel. METHOD: Electronic literature databases were searched and the findings of relevant studies were used to explore non-deployment-related risk and resilience factors. RESULTS: Fifty publications met the inclusion criteria. Determinants of non-deployment stress were identified as: relationships with others (including leadership/supervisory support; social support/cohesion; harassment/discrimination) and role-related stressors (role conflict; commitment and effort-reward imbalance; work overload/job demands; family-related issues/work-life balance; and other factors including control/autonomy, physical work environment and financial strain). Factors positively impacting wellbeing (such as exercise) were also identified. CONCLUSIONS: The literature suggests that non-deployment stressors present a significant occupational health hazard in routine military environments and interpersonal relationships at work are of fundamental importance. Findings suggest that in order to protect the wellbeing of personnel and improve performance, military organisations should prioritise strengthening relationships between employees and their supervisors/colleagues. Recommendations for addressing these stressors in British military personnel were developed. SN - 1360-0567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28132582/Non_deployment_factors_affecting_psychological_wellbeing_in_military_personnel:_literature_review_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -