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Weight and weight changes in early adulthood and later breast cancer risk.
Int J Cancer. 2017 05 01; 140(9):2003-2014.IJ

Abstract

Obesity is a well-established cause of postmenopausal breast cancer. However, early life adiposity is inversely associated with breast cancer incidence. To understand these conflicting relations, we use validated measures to assess adiposity in childhood and late adolescence, as well as weight change, in relation to total invasive breast cancer incidence and receptor subtypes. We conducted a prospective observational study among 74,177 women from the Nurses' Health Study from 1980-2012, with updated risk factors every 2 years during which 4,965 incident invasive breast cancers occurred. Overall, weight at age 18 was inversely associated with both premenopausal (HR per 30 kg = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.39-0.71) and postmenopausal (HR per 30 kg = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.72-0.92) breast cancer which was largely explained by adiposity at age 10. Long-term weight gain from age 18 both during premenopause and postmenopause were positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. However, premenopausal weight gain was not related to premenopausal breast cancer risk. Furthermore, weight gain since age 18 was positively associated with ER+/PR+ postmenopausal breast cancer (HR per 30 kg = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.36-1.65) but not ER+/PR- (HR per 30 kg = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.78-1.19) or ER-/PR- (HR per 30 kg = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.95-1.42) postmenopausal breast cancer. Overall, 17% of ER+/PR+ postmenopausal breast cancer and 14% of total postmenopausal breast cancer are attributable to weight gain of > 5 kg since age 18.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115.Siteman Cancer Center and Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63110.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115. Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02115.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, 01003-9304.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115.Siteman Cancer Center and Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63110.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28133728

Citation

Rosner, Bernard, et al. "Weight and Weight Changes in Early Adulthood and Later Breast Cancer Risk." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 140, no. 9, 2017, pp. 2003-2014.
Rosner B, Eliassen AH, Toriola AT, et al. Weight and weight changes in early adulthood and later breast cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 2017;140(9):2003-2014.
Rosner, B., Eliassen, A. H., Toriola, A. T., Chen, W. Y., Hankinson, S. E., Willett, W. C., Berkey, C. S., & Colditz, G. A. (2017). Weight and weight changes in early adulthood and later breast cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 140(9), 2003-2014. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30627
Rosner B, et al. Weight and Weight Changes in Early Adulthood and Later Breast Cancer Risk. Int J Cancer. 2017 05 1;140(9):2003-2014. PubMed PMID: 28133728.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight and weight changes in early adulthood and later breast cancer risk. AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Toriola,Adetunji T, AU - Chen,Wendy Y, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Berkey,Catherine S, AU - Colditz,Graham A, PY - 2016/07/30/received PY - 2017/01/06/revised PY - 2017/01/13/accepted PY - 2017/1/31/pubmed PY - 2017/5/6/medline PY - 2017/1/31/entrez KW - estrogen receptor KW - obesity KW - pre-adolescent adiposity KW - progesterone receptor KW - weight gain SP - 2003 EP - 2014 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 140 IS - 9 N2 - Obesity is a well-established cause of postmenopausal breast cancer. However, early life adiposity is inversely associated with breast cancer incidence. To understand these conflicting relations, we use validated measures to assess adiposity in childhood and late adolescence, as well as weight change, in relation to total invasive breast cancer incidence and receptor subtypes. We conducted a prospective observational study among 74,177 women from the Nurses' Health Study from 1980-2012, with updated risk factors every 2 years during which 4,965 incident invasive breast cancers occurred. Overall, weight at age 18 was inversely associated with both premenopausal (HR per 30 kg = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.39-0.71) and postmenopausal (HR per 30 kg = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.72-0.92) breast cancer which was largely explained by adiposity at age 10. Long-term weight gain from age 18 both during premenopause and postmenopause were positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. However, premenopausal weight gain was not related to premenopausal breast cancer risk. Furthermore, weight gain since age 18 was positively associated with ER+/PR+ postmenopausal breast cancer (HR per 30 kg = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.36-1.65) but not ER+/PR- (HR per 30 kg = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.78-1.19) or ER-/PR- (HR per 30 kg = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.95-1.42) postmenopausal breast cancer. Overall, 17% of ER+/PR+ postmenopausal breast cancer and 14% of total postmenopausal breast cancer are attributable to weight gain of > 5 kg since age 18. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28133728/Weight_and_weight_changes_in_early_adulthood_and_later_breast_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30627 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -