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Green tea consumption and cause-specific mortality: Results from two prospective cohort studies in China.
J Epidemiol. 2017 Jan; 27(1):36-41.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Green tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in Asia. While a possible protective role of green tea against various chronic diseases has been suggested in experimental studies, evidence from human studies remains controversial.

METHODS

We conducted this study using data from Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS) and Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), two population-based prospective cohorts of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai, China. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality associated with green tea intake were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

RESULTS

During a median follow-up of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively, 6517 (2741 men and 3776 women) deaths were documented. We found that green tea consumption was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90-1.01), particularly among never-smokers (HR 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.96). The inverse association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality (HR 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77-0.97) was slightly stronger than that with all-cause mortality. No significant association was observed between green tea intake and cancer mortality (HR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93-1.10).

CONCLUSIONS

Green tea consumption may be inversely associated with risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults, especially among never smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: ybxiang@shsci.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28135196

Citation

Zhao, Long-Gang, et al. "Green Tea Consumption and Cause-specific Mortality: Results From Two Prospective Cohort Studies in China." Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 27, no. 1, 2017, pp. 36-41.
Zhao LG, Li HL, Sun JW, et al. Green tea consumption and cause-specific mortality: Results from two prospective cohort studies in China. J Epidemiol. 2017;27(1):36-41.
Zhao, L. G., Li, H. L., Sun, J. W., Yang, Y., Ma, X., Shu, X. O., Zheng, W., & Xiang, Y. B. (2017). Green tea consumption and cause-specific mortality: Results from two prospective cohort studies in China. Journal of Epidemiology, 27(1), 36-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.je.2016.08.004
Zhao LG, et al. Green Tea Consumption and Cause-specific Mortality: Results From Two Prospective Cohort Studies in China. J Epidemiol. 2017;27(1):36-41. PubMed PMID: 28135196.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Green tea consumption and cause-specific mortality: Results from two prospective cohort studies in China. AU - Zhao,Long-Gang, AU - Li,Hong-Lan, AU - Sun,Jiang-Wei, AU - Yang,Yang, AU - Ma,Xiao, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Xiang,Yong-Bing, Y1 - 2016/10/18/ PY - 2016/02/16/received PY - 2017/1/31/entrez PY - 2017/1/31/pubmed PY - 2017/2/16/medline KW - All-cause mortality KW - CVD mortality KW - Cancer mortality KW - Cohort study KW - Green tea SP - 36 EP - 41 JF - Journal of epidemiology JO - J Epidemiol VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Green tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in Asia. While a possible protective role of green tea against various chronic diseases has been suggested in experimental studies, evidence from human studies remains controversial. METHODS: We conducted this study using data from Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS) and Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), two population-based prospective cohorts of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai, China. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality associated with green tea intake were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively, 6517 (2741 men and 3776 women) deaths were documented. We found that green tea consumption was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90-1.01), particularly among never-smokers (HR 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.96). The inverse association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality (HR 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77-0.97) was slightly stronger than that with all-cause mortality. No significant association was observed between green tea intake and cancer mortality (HR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93-1.10). CONCLUSIONS: Green tea consumption may be inversely associated with risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults, especially among never smokers. SN - 1349-9092 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28135196/Green_tea_consumption_and_cause_specific_mortality:_Results_from_two_prospective_cohort_studies_in_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0917-5040(16)30047-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -