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Dietary antioxidant vitamins intake and mortality: A report from two cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai.
J Epidemiol 2017; 27(3):89-97JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have evaluated dietary antioxidant vitamins intake in relation to risk of mortality in Asia.

METHODS

We examined the associations between total carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E from diet and risk of mortality from all causes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease in 134,358 participants (59,739 men and 74,619 women) from the Shanghai Men's Health Study and Shanghai Women's Health Study, two prospective cohort studies of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai. Participants were followed up for a median period of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

RESULTS

During the 495,332 and 1,029,198 person-years of follow-up for men and women, respectively, there were 10,079 deaths (4170 men and 5909 women). For men, compared with the lowest quintiles, the multivariable-adjusted risk reductions in the highest categories were 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92) for dietary total carotene and 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91) for dietary vitamin C. Associations were weaker in women than in men, though they were still statistically significant (highest versus lowest quintiles of dietary total carotene, HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95; dietary vitamin C: HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.91). Significant inverse associations were observed between dietary total carotene, vitamin C, and risk of cardiovascular disease mortality but not cancer mortality.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that total carotene and vitamin C intake from diet were inversely associated with deaths from all causes and cardiovascular disease in middle-aged or elderly people in China.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.SKLORG & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: ybxiang@shsci.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28142039

Citation

Zhao, Long-Gang, et al. "Dietary Antioxidant Vitamins Intake and Mortality: a Report From Two Cohort Studies of Chinese Adults in Shanghai." Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 27, no. 3, 2017, pp. 89-97.
Zhao LG, Shu XO, Li HL, et al. Dietary antioxidant vitamins intake and mortality: A report from two cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai. J Epidemiol. 2017;27(3):89-97.
Zhao, L. G., Shu, X. O., Li, H. L., Zhang, W., Gao, J., Sun, J. W., ... Xiang, Y. B. (2017). Dietary antioxidant vitamins intake and mortality: A report from two cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai. Journal of Epidemiology, 27(3), pp. 89-97. doi:10.1016/j.je.2016.10.002.
Zhao LG, et al. Dietary Antioxidant Vitamins Intake and Mortality: a Report From Two Cohort Studies of Chinese Adults in Shanghai. J Epidemiol. 2017;27(3):89-97. PubMed PMID: 28142039.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary antioxidant vitamins intake and mortality: A report from two cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai. AU - Zhao,Long-Gang, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, AU - Li,Hong-Lan, AU - Zhang,Wei, AU - Gao,Jing, AU - Sun,Jiang-Wei, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Xiang,Yong-Bing, Y1 - 2016/12/26/ PY - 2015/12/07/received PY - 2016/04/09/accepted PY - 2017/2/1/pubmed PY - 2017/4/5/medline PY - 2017/2/1/entrez KW - Antioxidants KW - Cohort studies KW - Mortality KW - Vitamins SP - 89 EP - 97 JF - Journal of epidemiology JO - J Epidemiol VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated dietary antioxidant vitamins intake in relation to risk of mortality in Asia. METHODS: We examined the associations between total carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E from diet and risk of mortality from all causes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease in 134,358 participants (59,739 men and 74,619 women) from the Shanghai Men's Health Study and Shanghai Women's Health Study, two prospective cohort studies of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai. Participants were followed up for a median period of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: During the 495,332 and 1,029,198 person-years of follow-up for men and women, respectively, there were 10,079 deaths (4170 men and 5909 women). For men, compared with the lowest quintiles, the multivariable-adjusted risk reductions in the highest categories were 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92) for dietary total carotene and 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91) for dietary vitamin C. Associations were weaker in women than in men, though they were still statistically significant (highest versus lowest quintiles of dietary total carotene, HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95; dietary vitamin C: HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.91). Significant inverse associations were observed between dietary total carotene, vitamin C, and risk of cardiovascular disease mortality but not cancer mortality. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that total carotene and vitamin C intake from diet were inversely associated with deaths from all causes and cardiovascular disease in middle-aged or elderly people in China. SN - 1349-9092 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28142039/Dietary_antioxidant_vitamins_intake_and_mortality:_A_report_from_two_cohort_studies_of_Chinese_adults_in_Shanghai_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0917-5040(16)30121-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -