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Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South-Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional analysis of 418 656 participants in the UK Biobank study.
Diabet Med. 2017 08; 34(8):1120-1128.DM

Abstract

AIMS

To quantify the extent to which ethnic differences in muscular strength might account for the substantially higher prevalence of diabetes in black and South-Asian compared with white European adults.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study used baseline data from the UK Biobank study on 418 656 white European, black and South-Asian participants, aged 40-69 years, who had complete data on diabetes status and hand-grip strength. Associations between hand-grip strength and diabetes were assessed using logistic regression and were adjusted for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS

Lower grip strength was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, independent of confounding factors, across all ethnicities in both men and women. Diabetes prevalence was approximately three- to fourfold higher in South-Asian and two- to threefold higher in black participants compared with white European participants across all levels of grip strength, but grip strength in South-Asian men and women was ~ 5-6 kg lower than in the other ethnic groups. Thus, the attributable risk for diabetes associated with low grip strength was substantially higher in South-Asian participants (3.9 and 4.2 cases per 100 men and women, respectively) than in white participants (2.0 and 0.6 cases per 100 men and women, respectively). Attributable risk associated with low grip strength was also high in black men (4.3 cases) but not in black women (0.4 cases).

CONCLUSIONS

Low strength is associated with a disproportionately large number of diabetes cases in South-Asian men and women and in black men. Trials are needed to determine whether interventions to improve strength in these groups could help reduce ethnic inequalities in diabetes prevalence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28144980

Citation

Ntuk, U E., et al. "Association Between Grip Strength and Diabetes Prevalence in Black, South-Asian, and White European Ethnic Groups: a Cross-sectional Analysis of 418 656 Participants in the UK Biobank Study." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 34, no. 8, 2017, pp. 1120-1128.
Ntuk UE, Celis-Morales CA, Mackay DF, et al. Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South-Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional analysis of 418 656 participants in the UK Biobank study. Diabet Med. 2017;34(8):1120-1128.
Ntuk, U. E., Celis-Morales, C. A., Mackay, D. F., Sattar, N., Pell, J. P., & Gill, J. M. R. (2017). Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South-Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional analysis of 418 656 participants in the UK Biobank study. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 34(8), 1120-1128. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13323
Ntuk UE, et al. Association Between Grip Strength and Diabetes Prevalence in Black, South-Asian, and White European Ethnic Groups: a Cross-sectional Analysis of 418 656 Participants in the UK Biobank Study. Diabet Med. 2017;34(8):1120-1128. PubMed PMID: 28144980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South-Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional analysis of 418 656 participants in the UK Biobank study. AU - Ntuk,U E, AU - Celis-Morales,C A, AU - Mackay,D F, AU - Sattar,N, AU - Pell,J P, AU - Gill,J M R, Y1 - 2017/02/23/ PY - 2017/01/27/accepted PY - 2017/2/2/pubmed PY - 2018/5/3/medline PY - 2017/2/2/entrez SP - 1120 EP - 1128 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet Med VL - 34 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: To quantify the extent to which ethnic differences in muscular strength might account for the substantially higher prevalence of diabetes in black and South-Asian compared with white European adults. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used baseline data from the UK Biobank study on 418 656 white European, black and South-Asian participants, aged 40-69 years, who had complete data on diabetes status and hand-grip strength. Associations between hand-grip strength and diabetes were assessed using logistic regression and were adjusted for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Lower grip strength was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, independent of confounding factors, across all ethnicities in both men and women. Diabetes prevalence was approximately three- to fourfold higher in South-Asian and two- to threefold higher in black participants compared with white European participants across all levels of grip strength, but grip strength in South-Asian men and women was ~ 5-6 kg lower than in the other ethnic groups. Thus, the attributable risk for diabetes associated with low grip strength was substantially higher in South-Asian participants (3.9 and 4.2 cases per 100 men and women, respectively) than in white participants (2.0 and 0.6 cases per 100 men and women, respectively). Attributable risk associated with low grip strength was also high in black men (4.3 cases) but not in black women (0.4 cases). CONCLUSIONS: Low strength is associated with a disproportionately large number of diabetes cases in South-Asian men and women and in black men. Trials are needed to determine whether interventions to improve strength in these groups could help reduce ethnic inequalities in diabetes prevalence. SN - 1464-5491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28144980/Association_between_grip_strength_and_diabetes_prevalence_in_black_South_Asian_and_white_European_ethnic_groups:_a_cross_sectional_analysis_of_418_656_participants_in_the_UK_Biobank_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13323 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -