Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

Abstract

The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28145611

Citation

Tinkle, Brad, et al. "Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type): Clinical Description and Natural History." American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part C, Seminars in Medical Genetics, vol. 175, no. 1, 2017, pp. 48-69.
Tinkle B, Castori M, Berglund B, et al. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2017;175(1):48-69.
Tinkle, B., Castori, M., Berglund, B., Cohen, H., Grahame, R., Kazkaz, H., & Levy, H. (2017). Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part C, Seminars in Medical Genetics, 175(1), pp. 48-69. doi:10.1002/ajmg.c.31538.
Tinkle B, et al. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type): Clinical Description and Natural History. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2017;175(1):48-69. PubMed PMID: 28145611.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history. AU - Tinkle,Brad, AU - Castori,Marco, AU - Berglund,Britta, AU - Cohen,Helen, AU - Grahame,Rodney, AU - Kazkaz,Hanadi, AU - Levy,Howard, Y1 - 2017/02/01/ PY - 2017/2/2/pubmed PY - 2017/10/20/medline PY - 2017/2/2/entrez KW - Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type KW - Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III KW - joint hypermobility KW - joint hypermobility syndrome SP - 48 EP - 69 JF - American journal of medical genetics. Part C, Seminars in medical genetics JO - Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet VL - 175 IS - 1 N2 - The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. SN - 1552-4876 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28145611/Hypermobile_Ehlers_Danlos_syndrome__a_k_a__Ehlers_Danlos_syndrome_Type_III_and_Ehlers_Danlos_syndrome_hypermobility_type_:_Clinical_description_and_natural_history_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.c.31538 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -