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Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
Ophthalmology 2017; 124(5):634-643O

Abstract

PURPOSE

To evaluate the associations between intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the intermediate and advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS

We followed 75 889 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 38 961 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were at least 50 years old, from 1984 to 2012 and 1986 to 2010, respectively. Cohort participants are mostly white (≥95%).

METHODS

We assessed dietary intake by a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) at baseline and every 4 years. We calculated cumulative average intakes of EPA and DHA from FFQs and also computed predicted erythrocyte and plasma scores directly from food intake using regression models. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the associations with AMD outcomes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

We confirmed 1589 incident intermediate and 1356 advanced AMD cases (primarily neovascular AMD) with a visual acuity of 20/30 or worse, owing primarily to AMD, by medical record review.

RESULTS

For intermediate AMD, the pooled hazard ratio (HR) between the 2 cohorts for DHA comparing the extreme quintiles of intake was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.92; P trend, 0.008) and for EPA + DHA was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.98; P trend, 0.03). The pooled HR for fatty fish, comparing ≥5 servings per week to almost never, was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.46-0.81; P trend, <0.001). For advanced AMD, the pooled HR for DHA was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84-1.21; P trend, 0.75) and for fatty fish was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.59-1.08; P trend, 0.11). Secondary analyses using predicted erythrocyte and plasma scores of EPA and DHA yielded slightly stronger inverse associations for intermediate AMD and similar results for advanced AMD.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher intakes of EPA and DHA may prevent or delay the occurrence of visually significant intermediate AMD. However, the totality of current evidence for EPA and DHA and advanced AMD is discordant, though there was no association with advanced AMD in the present study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: juan.wu@mail.harvard.edu.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island; Department of Epidemiology, Brown School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Bethesda Retina, Bethesda, Maryland.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Global Medical Affairs, Ophthalmics, Shire, Lexington, Massachusetts; Center for Translational Medicine, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28153441

Citation

Wu, Juan, et al. "Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration." Ophthalmology, vol. 124, no. 5, 2017, pp. 634-643.
Wu J, Cho E, Giovannucci EL, et al. Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmology. 2017;124(5):634-643.
Wu, J., Cho, E., Giovannucci, E. L., Rosner, B. A., Sastry, S. M., Willett, W. C., & Schaumberg, D. A. (2017). Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmology, 124(5), pp. 634-643. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.12.033.
Wu J, et al. Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmology. 2017;124(5):634-643. PubMed PMID: 28153441.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. AU - Wu,Juan, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Rosner,Bernard A, AU - Sastry,Srinivas M, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Schaumberg,Debra A, Y1 - 2017/01/30/ PY - 2016/04/11/received PY - 2016/11/15/revised PY - 2016/12/21/accepted PY - 2017/2/6/pubmed PY - 2017/7/20/medline PY - 2017/2/4/entrez SP - 634 EP - 643 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 124 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the associations between intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the intermediate and advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: We followed 75 889 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 38 961 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were at least 50 years old, from 1984 to 2012 and 1986 to 2010, respectively. Cohort participants are mostly white (≥95%). METHODS: We assessed dietary intake by a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) at baseline and every 4 years. We calculated cumulative average intakes of EPA and DHA from FFQs and also computed predicted erythrocyte and plasma scores directly from food intake using regression models. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the associations with AMD outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We confirmed 1589 incident intermediate and 1356 advanced AMD cases (primarily neovascular AMD) with a visual acuity of 20/30 or worse, owing primarily to AMD, by medical record review. RESULTS: For intermediate AMD, the pooled hazard ratio (HR) between the 2 cohorts for DHA comparing the extreme quintiles of intake was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.92; P trend, 0.008) and for EPA + DHA was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.98; P trend, 0.03). The pooled HR for fatty fish, comparing ≥5 servings per week to almost never, was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.46-0.81; P trend, <0.001). For advanced AMD, the pooled HR for DHA was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84-1.21; P trend, 0.75) and for fatty fish was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.59-1.08; P trend, 0.11). Secondary analyses using predicted erythrocyte and plasma scores of EPA and DHA yielded slightly stronger inverse associations for intermediate AMD and similar results for advanced AMD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher intakes of EPA and DHA may prevent or delay the occurrence of visually significant intermediate AMD. However, the totality of current evidence for EPA and DHA and advanced AMD is discordant, though there was no association with advanced AMD in the present study. SN - 1549-4713 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28153441/Dietary_Intakes_of_Eicosapentaenoic_Acid_and_Docosahexaenoic_Acid_and_Risk_of_Age_Related_Macular_Degeneration_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(16)32463-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -