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High-sensitive C-reactive protein and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study.
BMC Endocr Disord. 2017 Feb 08; 17(1):8.BE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The liver-derived C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive and systemic biomarker of inflammation, and has been associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in populations other than Chinese. Therefore, we prospectively examined the relation between plasma levels of CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among a Chinese population.

METHODS

Plasma high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) concentrations were assayed among 571 T2D cases and 571 controls nested in the prospective cohort of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Both cases and controls were free of physician-diagnosed diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer at blood collections (1999-2004). Incident physician-diagnosed T2D cases were self-reported during the follow-up visits (2006-2010), and controls were matched for age (±3 years) and date (±6 months) of blood collection and gender. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

The mean (SD) concentrations of hs-CRP were 2.79 (2.65) and 1.86 (2.03) mg/L, respectively, in cases and controls (P < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment for T2D risk factors such as lifestyle, body mass index, plasma triglycerides and HDL cholesterol, the OR comparing the extreme quartiles of hs-CRP was 1.74 [95% CI 1.12-2.70; P for trend = 0.016]. When the analysis was limited to 279 cases who had HbA1c ≥6.5% at the time of blood collection and their controls, the OR comparing the extreme quartiles of hs-CRP was 2.43 (95% CI 1.25-4.71; P for trend = 0.003). When confined to the other 292 subjects with HbA1c <6.5% and their controls, the corresponding OR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.64-2.39; P for trend = 0.93).

CONCLUSIONS

We found that CRP was not associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in this cohort of Chinese in Singapore. Previous positive findings from prospective studies might be partly due to undiagnosed T2D among the cases during blood collection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, Hubei, China. panan@hust.edu.cn.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore. Duke-NUS Medical School Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28178951

Citation

Pan, An, et al. "High-sensitive C-reactive Protein and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes: a Case-control Study Nested Within the Singapore Chinese Health Study." BMC Endocrine Disorders, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 8.
Pan A, Wang Y, Yuan JM, et al. High-sensitive C-reactive protein and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. BMC Endocr Disord. 2017;17(1):8.
Pan, A., Wang, Y., Yuan, J. M., & Koh, W. P. (2017). High-sensitive C-reactive protein and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 17(1), 8. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12902-017-0159-5
Pan A, et al. High-sensitive C-reactive Protein and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes: a Case-control Study Nested Within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. BMC Endocr Disord. 2017 Feb 8;17(1):8. PubMed PMID: 28178951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-sensitive C-reactive protein and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Pan,An, AU - Wang,Yeli, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, Y1 - 2017/02/08/ PY - 2016/10/17/received PY - 2017/02/03/accepted PY - 2017/2/10/entrez PY - 2017/2/10/pubmed PY - 2017/2/28/medline KW - C-reactive protein KW - Inflammation KW - Prospective studies KW - Type 2 diabetes SP - 8 EP - 8 JF - BMC endocrine disorders JO - BMC Endocr Disord VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The liver-derived C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive and systemic biomarker of inflammation, and has been associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in populations other than Chinese. Therefore, we prospectively examined the relation between plasma levels of CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among a Chinese population. METHODS: Plasma high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) concentrations were assayed among 571 T2D cases and 571 controls nested in the prospective cohort of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Both cases and controls were free of physician-diagnosed diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer at blood collections (1999-2004). Incident physician-diagnosed T2D cases were self-reported during the follow-up visits (2006-2010), and controls were matched for age (±3 years) and date (±6 months) of blood collection and gender. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: The mean (SD) concentrations of hs-CRP were 2.79 (2.65) and 1.86 (2.03) mg/L, respectively, in cases and controls (P < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment for T2D risk factors such as lifestyle, body mass index, plasma triglycerides and HDL cholesterol, the OR comparing the extreme quartiles of hs-CRP was 1.74 [95% CI 1.12-2.70; P for trend = 0.016]. When the analysis was limited to 279 cases who had HbA1c ≥6.5% at the time of blood collection and their controls, the OR comparing the extreme quartiles of hs-CRP was 2.43 (95% CI 1.25-4.71; P for trend = 0.003). When confined to the other 292 subjects with HbA1c <6.5% and their controls, the corresponding OR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.64-2.39; P for trend = 0.93). CONCLUSIONS: We found that CRP was not associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in this cohort of Chinese in Singapore. Previous positive findings from prospective studies might be partly due to undiagnosed T2D among the cases during blood collection. SN - 1472-6823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28178951/High_sensitive_C_reactive_protein_and_risk_of_incident_type_2_diabetes:_a_case_control_study_nested_within_the_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - https://bmcendocrdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12902-017-0159-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -