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The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort.

Abstract

Background:

Diet is known to influence systemic inflammation, a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Studies in ethnically diverse populations that examine the association between dietary inflammatory potential and CRC incidence are limited.

Objectives:

We used the Dietary Inflammatory Index to clarify the relation between the inflammatory potential of diet and CRC incidence across racial/ethnic groups. We hypothesized that proinflammatory diets would be associated with an increased risk of CRC, and that these associations may differ across racial/ethnic groups.

Methods:

The Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) follows a prospective study design. It includes 190,963 white, African-American, native Hawaiian, Japanese-American, and Latino men and women aged 45-75 y at recruitment and followed over 20 y. Participants completed a food frequency questionnaire from which energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) scores were computed and categorized into quartiles. CRC incidence was documented through linkage to cancer registry programs. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusting for known or expected CRC risk factors.

Results:

Among all participants, more-proinflammatory diets (highest quartile compared with lowest quartile) were associated with an increased risk of CRC (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.32). However, the effect size was larger for men (HR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.45) than for women (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.33), although the interaction term for sex was not statistically significant (P-interaction = 0.17). When stratified by race/ethnicity, the association was significantly different between groups for men (P-interaction = 0.01), although not for women (P-interaction = 0.20). Significant associations with HRs ranging from 2.33 to 1.04 were observed in white, Japanese-American, and Latino men, and native Hawaiian women.

Conclusions:

Overall, more-proinflammatory diets, as identified by the E-DII, were associated with increased CRC risk in MEC participants across racial/ethnic groups. This study adds to the evidence suggesting that diets with high proinflammatory potential may increase CRC risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN; bharmon1@memphis.edu.

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    Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

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    University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.

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    University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.

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    School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.

    ,

    Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

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    Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

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    South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; and.

    ,

    Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

    ,

    University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.

    Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 147:3 2017 03 pg 430-438

    MeSH

    African Americans
    Aged
    Asian Americans
    Cohort Studies
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Female
    Hispanic Americans
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28179489

    Citation

    Harmon, Brook E., et al. "The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 147, no. 3, 2017, pp. 430-438.
    Harmon BE, Wirth MD, Boushey CJ, et al. The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort. J Nutr. 2017;147(3):430-438.
    Harmon, B. E., Wirth, M. D., Boushey, C. J., Wilkens, L. R., Draluck, E., Shivappa, N., ... Hébert, J. R. (2017). The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort. The Journal of Nutrition, 147(3), pp. 430-438. doi:10.3945/jn.116.242529.
    Harmon BE, et al. The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort. J Nutr. 2017;147(3):430-438. PubMed PMID: 28179489.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The Dietary Inflammatory Index Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Multiethnic Cohort. AU - Harmon,Brook E, AU - Wirth,Michael D, AU - Boushey,Carol J, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Draluck,Emma, AU - Shivappa,Nitin, AU - Steck,Susan E, AU - Hofseth,Lorne, AU - Haiman,Christopher A, AU - Le Marchand,Loic, AU - Hébert,James R, Y1 - 2017/02/08/ PY - 2016/10/05/received PY - 2016/11/03/revised PY - 2017/01/09/accepted PY - 2017/2/10/pubmed PY - 2017/6/20/medline PY - 2017/2/10/entrez KW - cancer stage KW - chronic inflammation KW - colon cancer KW - racial/ethnic groups KW - rectal cancer SP - 430 EP - 438 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 147 IS - 3 N2 - Background: Diet is known to influence systemic inflammation, a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Studies in ethnically diverse populations that examine the association between dietary inflammatory potential and CRC incidence are limited.Objectives: We used the Dietary Inflammatory Index to clarify the relation between the inflammatory potential of diet and CRC incidence across racial/ethnic groups. We hypothesized that proinflammatory diets would be associated with an increased risk of CRC, and that these associations may differ across racial/ethnic groups.Methods: The Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) follows a prospective study design. It includes 190,963 white, African-American, native Hawaiian, Japanese-American, and Latino men and women aged 45-75 y at recruitment and followed over 20 y. Participants completed a food frequency questionnaire from which energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) scores were computed and categorized into quartiles. CRC incidence was documented through linkage to cancer registry programs. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusting for known or expected CRC risk factors.Results: Among all participants, more-proinflammatory diets (highest quartile compared with lowest quartile) were associated with an increased risk of CRC (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.32). However, the effect size was larger for men (HR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.45) than for women (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.33), although the interaction term for sex was not statistically significant (P-interaction = 0.17). When stratified by race/ethnicity, the association was significantly different between groups for men (P-interaction = 0.01), although not for women (P-interaction = 0.20). Significant associations with HRs ranging from 2.33 to 1.04 were observed in white, Japanese-American, and Latino men, and native Hawaiian women.Conclusions: Overall, more-proinflammatory diets, as identified by the E-DII, were associated with increased CRC risk in MEC participants across racial/ethnic groups. This study adds to the evidence suggesting that diets with high proinflammatory potential may increase CRC risk. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28179489/The_Dietary_Inflammatory_Index_Is_Associated_with_Colorectal_Cancer_Risk_in_the_Multiethnic_Cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.116.242529 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -