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Psychological processes in young bullies versus bully-victims.
Aggress Behav. 2017 Sep; 43(5):430-439.AB

Abstract

Some children who bully others are also victimized themselves ("bully-victims") whereas others are not victimized themselves ("bullies"). These subgroups have been shown to differ in their social functioning as early as in kindergarten. What is less clear are the motives that underlie the bullying behavior of young bullies and bully-victims. The present study examined whether bullies have proactive motives for aggression and anticipate to feel happy after victimizing others, whereas bully-victims have reactive motives for aggression, poor theory of mind skills, and attribute hostile intent to others. This "distinct processes hypothesis" was contrasted with the "shared processes hypothesis," predicting that bullies and bully-victims do not differ on these psychological processes. Children (n = 283, age 4-9) were classified as bully, bully-victim, or noninvolved using peer-nominations. Theory of mind, hostile intent attributions, and happy victimizer emotions were assessed using standard vignettes and false-belief tasks; reactive and proactive motives were assessed using teacher-reports. We tested our hypotheses using Bayesian model selection, enabling us to directly compare the distinct processes model (predicting that bullies and bully-victims deviate from noninvolved children on different psychological processes) against the shared processes model (predicting that bullies and bully-victims deviate from noninvolved children on all psychological processes alike). Overall, the shared processes model received more support than the distinct processes model. These results suggest that in early childhood, bullies and bully-victims have shared, rather than distinct psychological processes underlying their bullying behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28181256

Citation

van Dijk, Anouk, et al. "Psychological Processes in Young Bullies Versus Bully-victims." Aggressive Behavior, vol. 43, no. 5, 2017, pp. 430-439.
van Dijk A, Poorthuis AMG, Malti T. Psychological processes in young bullies versus bully-victims. Aggress Behav. 2017;43(5):430-439.
van Dijk, A., Poorthuis, A. M. G., & Malti, T. (2017). Psychological processes in young bullies versus bully-victims. Aggressive Behavior, 43(5), 430-439. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21701
van Dijk A, Poorthuis AMG, Malti T. Psychological Processes in Young Bullies Versus Bully-victims. Aggress Behav. 2017;43(5):430-439. PubMed PMID: 28181256.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological processes in young bullies versus bully-victims. AU - van Dijk,Anouk, AU - Poorthuis,Astrid M G, AU - Malti,Tina, Y1 - 2017/02/08/ PY - 2016/08/04/received PY - 2016/12/01/revised PY - 2016/12/08/accepted PY - 2017/2/10/pubmed PY - 2018/7/17/medline PY - 2017/2/10/entrez KW - bullying KW - early childhood KW - emotions KW - social cognition KW - victimization SP - 430 EP - 439 JF - Aggressive behavior JO - Aggress Behav VL - 43 IS - 5 N2 - Some children who bully others are also victimized themselves ("bully-victims") whereas others are not victimized themselves ("bullies"). These subgroups have been shown to differ in their social functioning as early as in kindergarten. What is less clear are the motives that underlie the bullying behavior of young bullies and bully-victims. The present study examined whether bullies have proactive motives for aggression and anticipate to feel happy after victimizing others, whereas bully-victims have reactive motives for aggression, poor theory of mind skills, and attribute hostile intent to others. This "distinct processes hypothesis" was contrasted with the "shared processes hypothesis," predicting that bullies and bully-victims do not differ on these psychological processes. Children (n = 283, age 4-9) were classified as bully, bully-victim, or noninvolved using peer-nominations. Theory of mind, hostile intent attributions, and happy victimizer emotions were assessed using standard vignettes and false-belief tasks; reactive and proactive motives were assessed using teacher-reports. We tested our hypotheses using Bayesian model selection, enabling us to directly compare the distinct processes model (predicting that bullies and bully-victims deviate from noninvolved children on different psychological processes) against the shared processes model (predicting that bullies and bully-victims deviate from noninvolved children on all psychological processes alike). Overall, the shared processes model received more support than the distinct processes model. These results suggest that in early childhood, bullies and bully-victims have shared, rather than distinct psychological processes underlying their bullying behavior. SN - 1098-2337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28181256/Psychological_processes_in_young_bullies_versus_bully_victims_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21701 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -