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Dairy intake in relation to prostate cancer survival.
Int J Cancer 2017; 140(9):2060-2069IJ

Abstract

Dairy intake has been associated with increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. Two US cohort studies reported increased prostate cancer-specific mortality with increased high-fat milk intake. We examined whether dairy and related nutrient intake were associated with prostate cancer progression in a Swedish patient population with high dairy consumption. We prospectively followed 525 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer (diagnosed 1989-1994). We identified and confirmed deaths through February 2011 (n = 222 prostate cancer-specific, n = 268 from other causes). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between food or nutrient intake and prostate cancer-specific death. On average, patients consumed 5.0 servings/day of total dairy products at diagnosis. In the whole population, high-fat milk intake was not associated with prostate cancer-specific death (95% CI: 0.78, 2.10; p-trend = 0.32; multivariate-adjusted model). However, among patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, compared to men who consumed <1 servings/day of high-fat milk, those who drank ≥3 servings/day had an increased hazard of prostate cancer mortality (HR = 6.10; 95% CI: 2.14, 17.37; p-trend = 0.004; multivariate-adjusted model). Low-fat milk intake was associated with a borderline reduction in prostate cancer death among patients with localized prostate cancer. These associations were not observed among patients diagnosed with advanced stage prostate cancer. Our data suggest a positive association between high-fat milk intake and prostate cancer progression among patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Further studies are warranted to investigate this association and elucidate the mechanisms by which high-fat milk intake may promote prostate cancer progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Medicine and the Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28187509

Citation

Downer, Mary K., et al. "Dairy Intake in Relation to Prostate Cancer Survival." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 140, no. 9, 2017, pp. 2060-2069.
Downer MK, Batista JL, Mucci LA, et al. Dairy intake in relation to prostate cancer survival. Int J Cancer. 2017;140(9):2060-2069.
Downer, M. K., Batista, J. L., Mucci, L. A., Stampfer, M. J., Epstein, M. M., Håkansson, N., ... Andersson, S. O. (2017). Dairy intake in relation to prostate cancer survival. International Journal of Cancer, 140(9), pp. 2060-2069. doi:10.1002/ijc.30642.
Downer MK, et al. Dairy Intake in Relation to Prostate Cancer Survival. Int J Cancer. 2017 05 1;140(9):2060-2069. PubMed PMID: 28187509.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy intake in relation to prostate cancer survival. AU - Downer,Mary K, AU - Batista,Julie L, AU - Mucci,Lorelei A, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Epstein,Mara Meyer, AU - Håkansson,Niclas, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Johansson,Jan-Erik, AU - Andrén,Ove, AU - Fall,Katja, AU - Andersson,Sven-Olof, Y1 - 2017/02/22/ PY - 2016/10/31/received PY - 2017/01/17/revised PY - 2017/01/26/accepted PY - 2017/2/12/pubmed PY - 2017/5/6/medline PY - 2017/2/11/entrez KW - dairy KW - diet KW - milk KW - prostate cancer KW - prostate cancer mortality SP - 2060 EP - 2069 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 140 IS - 9 N2 - Dairy intake has been associated with increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. Two US cohort studies reported increased prostate cancer-specific mortality with increased high-fat milk intake. We examined whether dairy and related nutrient intake were associated with prostate cancer progression in a Swedish patient population with high dairy consumption. We prospectively followed 525 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer (diagnosed 1989-1994). We identified and confirmed deaths through February 2011 (n = 222 prostate cancer-specific, n = 268 from other causes). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between food or nutrient intake and prostate cancer-specific death. On average, patients consumed 5.0 servings/day of total dairy products at diagnosis. In the whole population, high-fat milk intake was not associated with prostate cancer-specific death (95% CI: 0.78, 2.10; p-trend = 0.32; multivariate-adjusted model). However, among patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, compared to men who consumed <1 servings/day of high-fat milk, those who drank ≥3 servings/day had an increased hazard of prostate cancer mortality (HR = 6.10; 95% CI: 2.14, 17.37; p-trend = 0.004; multivariate-adjusted model). Low-fat milk intake was associated with a borderline reduction in prostate cancer death among patients with localized prostate cancer. These associations were not observed among patients diagnosed with advanced stage prostate cancer. Our data suggest a positive association between high-fat milk intake and prostate cancer progression among patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Further studies are warranted to investigate this association and elucidate the mechanisms by which high-fat milk intake may promote prostate cancer progression. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28187509/Dairy_intake_in_relation_to_prostate_cancer_survival_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30642 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -